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CVs vs Resumes

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In Australia, I've always used a Resume when applying for jobs.
In my experience, this is expected to be brief and to the point - preferably one page, and no more than two - quickly covering your experience and skill-set.

I'm pretty sure this is the norm in Australia and maybe the US too.

Now I'm applying for some European jobs, and have been asked to send in a CV "as detailed as possible", and I'm guessing my standard resume template isn't going to cut it.
I'm guessing I should re-write my resume, except ignoring the usual briefness/space concerns? i.e. cover the responsibilities/duties involved previous jobs / education, but write as much as I need to (instead of just a few short bullet points for each)?

Also, do you put references/referees in a CV, and/or should I include the 'references available on request' line?

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It depends. :-)

I'm in the US and a full CV is rare. I've seen a handful, so most of this is secondhand information:

Most CVs are the more modern single page resume, but two pages. I've read that it is normal to treat them as two-sided pages, so two sides is actually one CV page.

A full Curriculum Vitae for a programmer would list what you studied every year in school and grades. It would include your long term career goals (in potentially 2-3 paragraphs). It would also include a personal statement about you, your hopes and aspirations.

It would include at least a mention of every job you have ever had -- which is different than the US where it is customary to limit to just relevant jobs. Each job would include details, perhaps a paragraph or two, about what you did and how you did it. (If you kept a job for many years you would need a much longer description.) Some places also want details of why you left each job.

Unlike a resume it could contain details about your hobbies and other things that are unrelated to your work. It would include details of any certifications and awards, minor credentials, and even your general competencies.

Also, it depends on the location. Some locations prefer a photo, longer or shorter text, and even details of your religion and other personal beliefs.

A recent graduate could have 1-2 pages (2-4 sides), and another page (six sides) if they attended post-graduate studies or published research papers. If you have a decade of work experience I'd imagine anywhere from three to six pages (6-12 sides) depending on what you have done.

If you mail it, you would want it in a full-size envelope with no folds.



From what I understand, the reason for the detail is that in many countries getting a job is a lifetime commitment from the employer. They must show strong legal cause to fire/layoff an employee. Since it is nearly impossible to get rid of a bad hire, they want to make absolutely certain that you will fit in.

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Quote:
Original post by frob
different than the US where it is customary to limit to just relevant jobs.

I always advise my students to list every job. Most interviewers will question gaps in a resume's timeline, so one had best have a good explanation for those gaps.

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Original post by Tom Sloper
Quote:
Original post by frob
different than the US where it is customary to limit to just relevant jobs.

I always advise my students to list every job. Most interviewers will question gaps in a resume's timeline, so one had best have a good explanation for those gaps.
Explanation: I was doing {other job}, which didn't seem relevant to the position.

I agree that gaps during a professional career should be explained, but a simple employer, job title, and dates would be enough for unrelated jobs. A game programmer who spent a year doing freelance database work during a down economy? Mostly irrelevant.

I really don't care if you mopped floors or flipped burgers during high school or to support yourself in college when you are applying as a software engineer a decade later. It is irrelevant to the position.

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Well, type "CV" and "whatever country" into google.

All countries have a bit different style. In one country you have to be honest and the smallest cosmetics is considered a lie. Some countries require all the personal data (including gender), some countries accept phone-number and email address.
In some countries academic history should be included, in some countries sending as attachment is better. Same for references ("available blabla", or simply include).
In some countries mentioning the military service is obligatory. Look into it.

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Isn't resume just American for CV?
I don't know about Australia but American resumes look pretty like European CVs whilst American CVs are just...weird. More geared towards academic jobs and detail study interests and all that.

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Original post by Tyrr
Isn't resume just American for CV?
I don't know about Australia but American resumes look pretty like European CVs whilst American CVs are just...weird. More geared towards academic jobs and detail study interests and all that.

It's just a style, as szecs pointed out above.

An academic CV is very different from a professional resume. They are not the same thing. The former is not just jobs, but also focused on comprehensive assessment of all educational background, papers, presentations, and publications. The latter is what most people use to get a job.

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Quote:
Original post by szecs
Well, type "CV" and "whatever country" into google.

All countries have a bit different style. In one country you have to be honest and the smallest cosmetics is considered a lie. Some countries require all the personal data (including gender), some countries accept phone-number and email address.
In some countries academic history should be included, in some countries sending as attachment is better. Same for references ("available blabla", or simply include).
In some countries mentioning the military service is obligatory. Look into it.


Yes,You are right that CV vs Resume a bit difference.

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Having being in the games industry in Australia and programming for a while now, I would say more detail the better.

Normally the 1 page resume comes around because a recruiter will be reading the resume, and will instantly dismiss it if it doesn't have certain keywords.

The games industry and technical jobs specifically like detailed resumes. i.e. they want all the nitty gritty details because we are technical people and can cope with something a bit longer

I used to have a short resume and never used to get jobs. I kept getting the feedback there wasn't enough detail. Once I started to put a ton of detail into my resumes I started to get jobs.

In terms of Referee I tend to put them in, but the employer if they are interested are going to ask for your referee list anyway.

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