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rubsnick

My intentions are to make a game for the IOS....

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Alright well this is my ULTIMATE GOAL! To make a game for the IOS (I already have it in mind)

Now I have no knowledge of game development as a whole.... My biggest question is the following. I started learning how to manipulate DirectX using C++ I learned a couple of things. As it stands I only own a PC for programming. But you need a MAC for Ios development but they are alternatives.... Overall what I'm asking is should I continue with Direct X learning or should I use the alternative SDK's that are on windows for the the development? I mean.. Here is what I have planned.

Option 1- Continue using direct x and learn how to develop games for windows and make the game I have in mind for windows (don't know if this is easier or whatever)

Option 2- Go to IOS where it might be more likely to sell or something and use the SDK's on windows then get borrow my dads mac and finish up the job or something.

Overall what do you guys recommend? I mean are the sales for iOS worth it or what? Should I just stick with Windows? I mean if I make the game could I put it on steam and sell it for $5 would it sell enough? I'm just overall very confused....

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If you're targetting iOS I would start learning some opengl instead of directX. iOS uses OpenGL ES, which is a slimmed down version of the OpenGL API for mobile, but it is pretty much the same as OpenGL.

OpenGL runs just as well as DirectX on windows, so there's no harm to making a windows game with it then using that knowledge to help you build an iOS game eventually as well.

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Quote:
Original post by karwosts
If you're targetting iOS I would start learning some opengl instead of directX. iOS uses OpenGL ES, which is a slimmed down version of the OpenGL API for mobile, but it is pretty much the same as OpenGL.

OpenGL runs just as well as DirectX on windows, so there's no harm to making a windows game with it then using that knowledge to help you build an iOS game eventually as well.


So I should learn opengl so that my knowledge can be applied to the iphone and mac? Tha makes sense I could make the game for pc/mac and idevices along with the psp/ps3.(psp minis)

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If those are the platforms you want to target, than that seems appropriate. OpenGL also covers android devices too if you are developing mobile games.

Although you won't be able to do anything with the ps3/psp. They only license with established game studios and it will cost you mucho money (forget how much, its either in the tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars range for a devkit).

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Quote:
Original post by karwosts
If those are the platforms you want to target, than that seems appropriate. OpenGL also covers android devices too if you are developing mobile games.

Although you won't be able to do anything with the ps3/psp. They only license with established game studios and it will cost you mucho money (forget how much, its either in the tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars range for a devkit).


Oh what I meant by PS3 and PSP was the Mini's they have going on. It's for indie devs, I mean Look at Age of ZOmbies (on IOS and PSP/PS3) ya know? But I didn't know android that's pretty awesome. Ya know? I can also put it on Android. But this pretty much covers my ass so the investment would be awesome.

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It may be for indie devs but that doesn't mean that you can submit whatever you want there:

http://www.ps3informer.com/playstation-3/news/how-to-become-a-psp-minis-developer-010692.php

Quote:

Would-be PSP Mini developers are looking at an outlay of at least $10,000 dollars to have a credible chance at getting their creation on the PSP Store. This cost includes the fee for establishing a corporation, creating a good website, purchasing a PSP development kit, and other legal licensing fees associated with publishing your video game.


But don't let that discourage you. Start with more accessible platforms, and if by some chance you end up with a million dollar hit then yeah you might be able to put it on the ps[p3].

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Quote:
Original post by karwosts
It may be for indie devs but that doesn't mean that you can submit whatever you want there:

http://www.ps3informer.com/playstation-3/news/how-to-become-a-psp-minis-developer-010692.php

Quote:

Would-be PSP Mini developers are looking at an outlay of at least $10,000 dollars to have a credible chance at getting their creation on the PSP Store. This cost includes the fee for establishing a corporation, creating a good website, purchasing a PSP development kit, and other legal licensing fees associated with publishing your video game.


But don't let that discourage you. Start with more accessible platforms, and if by some chance you end up with a million dollar hit then yeah you might be able to put it on the ps[p3].


Ah thanks for that article, It's handy to know that. So PSP Mini would be something for when I have an actual company. So my better bet would be XNA and the Xbox live indie program? Does the xbox support OPenGL?

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Original post by karwosts
No, microsoft uses directx for everything (or xna, which is similar to directx). Xbox is xna only.


thought so....I'll just stick with Open GL.... I'm just one guy. XD Alright thanks everyone for the help. I think I know what to do. So how different is OpenGL and OPENGL ES2.0?

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If you're lacking development experience, I recommend Cocos2d-iphone. It's excellent and makes knocking up iPhone games really quick. Handles the use of OpenGL and also has physics support "out of the box".

As for going for OGL vs ES2 comparasons,

The most important difference is that ES2 does not support fixed function calls, everything is done with shaders. No glBegin/glEnd, glVertex2f, etc...

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Original post by rubsnick
So how different is OpenGL and OPENGL ES2.0?
OpenGl 4.1 is bridged to OpenGL ES 2.0 via a compatibility extension. This means that you can develop OpenGL ES applications for both desktop and mobile, without changes to the actual OpenGL portion of your code.

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