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Python for 2D game programming?

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Hi there, I was recommended Python for 2D game programming and was wondering if this was a good option? I don't know if it would be as good compared to C++ but I was told PyGame and Python would be a good place to start. (I'm a beginner at programming btw.)

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There is some weird stuff going on with some really awkward and foreign symbols. It's really hard to read if you ask me.
Can you point out anything specific? I see no foreign and awkward symbols. I mean, if that's what you consider awkward...

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Python is a powerful language in that you can do fairly complicated tasks with a fraction of the code it would take you in C/C++, even with the STL. It is a good language for beginners because it lets you get right to programming. Getting through C and C++'s compilation model alone can be a nightmare for beginners.

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Original post by Geometrian
This is true. Python is one of the easiest languages to use. For compatibility, I'd recommend Python 2.5 or 2.6. PyGame makes 2D game programming almost trivial.

As far as I can tell, most popular Python libs have been already ported to Py 2.7 as well. One advantage of Python 2.7 is that it contains some backported features from Py3k that should make it easier in the long run to port your Python app / game to Py3k at some later point.

Prolly not what a beginner will do anyway, but getting a feeling where the language is heading to is a good idea IMO.

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Original post by boogyman19946
I don't want to go against the majority say, but is Python really that easy to use? I mean, have a look at the syntax: Python syntax

There is some weird stuff going on with some really awkward and foreign symbols. It's really hard to read if you ask me.
With the exception of the section of regular expressions -- which aren't strictly Python, and are available in many programming languages, always with the same horrible looking syntax -- I don't see anything on that page that should seem out-of-the-ordinary when compared to the majority of other programming languages.

Most people tend to think of Python as being easier to read than many other languages; I've heard it described as "executable pseudo-code". This is all of course a matter of personal preference, but in general, yes, Python really is "that easy to use".

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