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draconar

Software Engineering books

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Hello all,

After some time, I'm finally managing to get a grip on the C++ language and its libraries, deal with compilers, linkers, etc. I even got my first prototype up and running with a reasonable frame rate, etc.

My questions and my problems are: how to get on to the next level? I've been having lots of headaches and troubles trying to get my OOP designs solid and prone to growth, but it is just too hard! Harder even than the programming itself. Off course there isn't no silver bullet, but I really want to improve my design skills.

What are your favorite software engineering books? Focused on games or not.

Cheers!
Fabio

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1) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with Applications
2) AntiPatterns: Refactoring Software, Architectures, and Projects in Crisis

The second is about what not to do and how to recover from mistakes :)

Hope this helps!

Enjoy

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hi guys,

thanks for the tips! I already have code complete & the GoF Patterns book but haven't read both of 'em. I tried the GoF, but found it incredible difficult (but I was much greener in OOP then..)

What you guys think about Martin Fowler's books?



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Take a look at Head First Design Patterns. It's written in the context of Java, but the code is similar enough and the information is directly relevant to C++. I found it incredibly effective at clearing up some of the fog that design patterns can create. It left me looking for opportunities to use what I had learned.

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I second the Head First Design Patterns book. Very good for learning patterns, after which you might want to transfer to a drier, more direct book for reference.

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