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GraySnakeGenocide

If I want to design or program games for Sony and Microsoft, am I on the wrong path?

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At this moment I am currently learning C# and XNA, which is strictly Microsoft/360.

I hear almost all Sony games are made using C++. Which was my original programming choice, but my friend convinced me to switch to C#/XNA because it would be "quicker" per se to be able to make a game, and so we could work together.

But, the main deal is, am I on the wrong path if I would like to make games for both Sony and Microsoft? Or am I on a one-way street to making games for Microsoft?

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It's not clear if you actually want to work for Sony or Microsoft, or if you want to develop your own games on the xbox/ps3.

If your question is the latter (I'm guessing that it is), than you won't be able to develop anything for the PS3 in any language. You need a devkit to make any games for the PS3, and they cost tens of thousands of dollars and are only sold to professional development studios with a proven track record.

If you want to put something on Xbox360, you can do it in XNA I think and put it for sale on their indie game channel. There's no PS3 equivalent.

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XNA games are made with C#, but all the regular games you'd go get in the store are written in C++. Also, when making games for the Wii, the DS, the PSP etc it's all C++ too.

If you want to make AAA nextgen games you are going to need to know C++.

If you dont care so much about that, you can make xbox live arcade games with C#, cell phone games with java, and internet games with actionscript.

That being said, if you are after AAA nextgen game development, it could be a good move learning C# first because it's easier to learn and work with, and you get quicker results for your efforts.

Make sense? Hope it helps!

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I'm saying if I were to work for a company that makes multiplatform games. Would the path i'm on only allow me to make games for Microsoft (being the C# language).

I've heard from quite a few places that most if not all of the PS3 AAA titles are made using C++.

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Original post by Atrix256
XNA games are made with C#, but all the regular games you'd go get in the store are written in C++. Also, when making games for the Wii, the DS, the PSP etc it's all C++ too.

If you want to make AAA nextgen games you are going to need to know C++.

If you dont care so much about that, you can make xbox live arcade games with C#, cell phone games with java, and internet games with actionscript.

That being said, if you are after AAA nextgen game development, it could be a good move learning C# first because it's easier to learn and work with, and you get quicker results for your efforts.

Make sense? Hope it helps!


yeah :(.

How easy is transitioning from C# to C++ though?

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Original post by GraySnakeGenocide
How easy is transitioning from C# to C++ though?


It's pretty easy. The languages are fairly similar. You'll have perhaps a lot to learn about manual memory management.

The reality is that you won't get hired in the professional games industry without knowing C++ very well. It's pretty standard practice to ask questions about more advanced details of the language as part of the interview process.

However, if you're just learning your first language, C++ is generally considered to be a bad place to start. It's far easier to learn your 2nd language than your first, so it's better to learn on a more modern language just so you can avoid some of the lower level details that shouldn't matter so much in the early learning process.

-me

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Original post by GraySnakeGenocide
I just hope i'm not wasting my time, it's a pain in the backside remembering C# as is.


Learning a language is never a waste of time. After you get really proficient with your first language you should strive to learn a new one at least every couple years. It definitely gets exponentially easier with each new language. Remembering syntax is just a matter of practice

-me

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Original post by GraySnakeGenocide
I just hope i'm not wasting my time, it's a pain in the backside remembering C# as is.


Its not a waste of time, you will need to learn far more than one language to be a good programmer anyway.

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Original post by GraySnakeGenocide
I just hope i'm not wasting my time

So you're saying you are lazy. Sorry, but lazy people cannot hack it as game programmers. Fact of life.

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