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bronxbomber92

Unity Data Oriented Design Question

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I was looking through an old thread on DOD and I came across this post by Hodgman: http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=575076&whichpage=2�

Looking at his code, I see this:


ParticleLifeData& life = lifeData;
ParticleLocation& pos = location;



and


ParticleLocation& pos = location;
ParticleMaterial& mat = material;



In both instances, each lookup into lifeData, location, or material will cause a catch miss, won't it? Assuming a 64 kb cache line, if the index into lifeData causes a cache miss, then lifeData, lifeData[i + 1], lifeData[i + 2], lifeData[i + 3], lifeData[i + 4], lifeData[i + 5], lifeData[i + 6], lifeData[i + 7] will be loaded into a cache line. But when locations is indexed, won't that cause another cache miss since the cache was either just filled or was all ready loaded with some block of lifeData? If this is the case, would it make more sense to pair either lifeData and location into one structure, or pair location and material into one structure so that the cache miss can be eliminated in one of the cases? Or, is there no cache miss because lifeData, location and material will each be loaded into separate cache lines? If this is the case, then how does the CPU know which cache line should be used when a cache miss is incurred (ie say material causes a cache miss, how does the cpu know not to use the cache line that location is loaded into; is it able to tell which cache line contains the "oldest" memory [ie, last touched]?)?

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Quote:
Original post by bronxbomber92
is there no cache miss because lifeData, location and material will each be loaded into separate cache lines?
Yes (hopefully, most of the time - see associativity below).
Quote:
But when locations is indexed [after indexing lifeData], won't that cause another cache miss since the cache was either just filled or was all ready loaded with some block of lifeData?
No, the cache is made up of many lines. Hopefully each array will end up in different parts of the cache.
Quote:
In both instances, each lookup into lifeData, location, or material will cause a catch miss, won't it? Assuming a 64 kb cache line, if the index into lifeData causes a cache miss, then lifeData, lifeData[i + 1], lifeData[i + 2], lifeData[i + 3], lifeData[i + 4], lifeData[i + 5], lifeData[i + 6], lifeData[i + 7] will be loaded into a cache line.
If [i+0] to [i+7] are all loaded into a cache line, then you definitely won't get a cache miss when accessing those 8 elements. You might get a cache-miss when accessing [i+8], however, the CPU has a prediction unit which will hopefully realise that you're traversing an array, and it will also fetch the next cache line from RAM in advance!
If not, you can issue your own prefetch instructions to do this (grab cache lines that you'll need soon, to avoid cache misses) - although, it's hard to do this right without the help of an expensive profiler ;)
Quote:
If this is the case, would it make more sense to pair either lifeData and location into one structure, or pair location and material into one structure so that the cache miss can be eliminated in one of the cases?
The reason that the particle data was broken into 3 structures in that thread (Life, Location and Material) was because different algorithms used different sub-sets of the total data.

Update only needed Life and Location data, while Render only needed Location and Material data.

So, by breaking it up into 3 structures, we're preventing Update from loading Material data into the cache for no reason, and preventing Render from loading Life data into the cache for no reason.
Quote:
how does the CPU know which cache line should be used when a cache miss is incurred (ie say material causes a cache miss, how does the cpu know not to use the cache line that location is loaded into; is it able to tell which cache line contains the "oldest" memory [ie, last touched]?)?
Different CPUs use different algorithms. The way that a large amount of RAM is mapped into a small amount of cache is called cache associativity.

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Thank you Hodgman! For some reason I was under the impression that there was only one cache line. The design of the program definitely makes much more sense knowing each array will most likely end up in different cache lines.

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