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Ryl

Possible? Files lost, only got the release

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OMGGGG , I dont know waht happened, but i lost the files of my game, but i got the release though, i tried to decompile it, but nothing worked, so with that .exe, can i use it for my multiplayer project? is that even possible? only the .exe ? or i make another project to lead to the .exe and, how the hell am i supose to do that? aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!

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You accidentally your whole game? I'd just start over from scratch if you lost your source. I also recommend using a version control system on a separate server so if you lose your computer you'll have a "backup" (and if you lose your version control server you often have a working copy).

Take a deep breath. Also why did you post this in the multiplayer programming forum?

// Edit also you've only been working on this multiplayer project for like 10 days? You should be able to recode everything pretty quickly.

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The first time this happens to anybody, you can tell a lot about their character.

Some people will run around with their hands in the air. Then they will go back to try something else. Then they will start talking about how great their project was, if only some great injustice hadn't befell them and taken their source away.

Other people will say "oh, that was my fault; how could I have been so dumb?" Then they will set up a backup solution of some sort, and make it automatic (because if it isn't automatic, then you won't have a backup). Then they will say "I had done some work, and then I lost it because I didn't have a backup, but now I do, and now I re-do the work with the benefit of everything I learned doing it the first time."

The first time it happened to me, I was in the first camp. That didn't work out so well, long-term, so the second time it happened to me, I switched to the second camp. The third time and on it happened, well, I had a back-up, so I never really lost anything.

Easiest to get started with is probably Subversion, because there are a number of free hosts. "best" long term right now is probably Git, although it's pretty hard to get started with, especially on Windows. The main free host (github) also isn't suitable for everyone.

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I think it's worth noting that version control alone isn't the best of backups, as it's something you directly work with. Even if we ignore possible software problems, user error is another potential point of failure: I was quite fortunate to have a USB thumb drive backup of a project I managed to clobber with an extremely old revision, which I force-pushed to my github repository before noticing, all shortly after my laptop -- and it's copy of the repository -- died.

Since then I've made my backup a bit more automatic (a few robocopy commands in a .bat file do wonders) and have increased the frequency of my backups to weekly.

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I don't understand the concept of weekly/daily/hourly backups. I have never had 1 backup made, and I have also never once lost data. I run my computers nearly 24/7 for months on end, and I use them quite a bit during that time. I also don't download half the crap most people do, and I am safe in my not installing everything that strikes my fancy. I DO however still use a version control system (xp-dev svn) for the unlikely eventuality. I DO NOT backup my system as anything lost can be restored with a simple install. Any important data shouldn't be stored in your computer (maybe in the cloud) and all media should be stored on some form of removable memory and not on your hard drive.

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We use automated backups at work and they have come in handy many times. They are an easy systems-level way of recovering something you accidentally deleted, or to protect against disk failure.

I don't know what downloading crap has to do with anything.

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Quote:
Original post by adam4813
I DO NOT backup my system as anything lost can be restored with a simple install.

I don't back up anything that can be restored with a simple install. Backups don't have to be full disk images (that's just the brute force approach which ensures you don't forget anything by including everything). What you do want to back up is important data.
Quote:
Any important data shouldn't be stored in your computer (maybe in the cloud) and all media should be stored on some form of removable memory and not on your hard drive.

I'd lean more towards "all three locations", in which case you are making backups (at least if they're frequently synchronized). I don't know about you, but I see people's thumb drives dying far more frequently than I see their main hard drives dying. The cloud is no panacea either, especially for example the web hosting front. Too often you hear of people on cheap hosts losing their entire site and database because the server died and the host left the responsibility of making backups to the end user. Or their backup process stopped working when the backup became larger than the tape. Or whatever.

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Quote:
Original post by MaulingMonkey
I think it's worth noting that version control alone isn't the best of backups, as it's something you directly work with....


Quoted for emphasis.

Version control is better than nothing, but it is *not* a backup solution. Same situation with Mirrored RAID setups -- better than nothing, still not backups. Raid protects you from hardware failure. Source control protects you from taking your source code down a stupid and irreversible path. Backups save you from human error and, if they're remotely hosted, geographically-centered catastrophes (fire, flood, tornado, earthquake, disgruntled employees).

Source control alone would have saved most of your work this time, assuming you were using it properly and making frequent checkins, but you should take this as a sign to establish both source control and regular backups.

As for Adam, well, you're tempting fate my friend. Removable media can break or become lost -- and Murphy's law states that this will coincide with a catastrophic hard disk failure. I suppose, technically, that removable media constitutes a backup, but only if its updated regularly.


On my main machine, I've got two 160GB SATA drives in a mirrored RAID setup where all my important data sits, and a 500GB "backup" drive where all the backups of the RAID go (I also store a my media backups here -- stuff that could be re-ripped if necessary, but would suck to do so.) I don't (yet) store any of my backups offsite, but I really should soon.


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According to Murphy's law my whole life is the law, so that means hard drive failure isn't on my list :). I do mean that important data (credit card, SSN, etc) should be paper copy and not store primarily on a hard drive, and media (movies, pictures, music, etc) should be store on some form of removable media, not so much for back up reasons, but so it is portable and can be taken with you to share with friends.

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