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cebugdev

directx 9 + physics using mesh

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hi,

Dont bash me yet, i know that there are a lot of forums regarding using of physX engine with directx, but i just want to VERIFY the steps in integrating physX with directX, because of so many forums, i am already confused on the step by step procedure.
Im using directx .x skinned mesh with the scene loaded also in .x mesh implemented using octree.

my question;
1. What are the steps in integrating my directx meshes (both animated and static) into physX.
- what bounding volume should i used for my animated skineed mesh(a humanoid character)?

2. What is cooking in physX?

3. Do i need to implement my own OCTREE or physX engine can handle spatial scene already?

4. What will happen if the animated character changed animation, do i need to update physX? how?

all i knw right now is

1. load static scene mesh for level
2. Set physx paramater
3. cook static mesh and add as actor <-- im not sure
4. load animated mesh
5. ...
6. ...

all help is appreciated,
Thnaks

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Physx doesn't care about your scene, it only think about shapes and actors, the actors are made of shapes. The actor is the most important concept in Physx, is the way to let you interact with the library, as applying forces, torque, etc. As you know, to place the mesh on your scene, you transform the vertex positions using the world matrix, each actor has his own world matrix.

Shapes are shapes.. basic geometry, box, sphere, capsule, etc, you may build an actor with different shapes, because shapes are always convex geometry, and the concept of cooking is thay physx takes your mesh data (ie your .x mesh) and use complex algorithms to transform it into a convex hull, by the way it not always succeed, and have some limitations.

Really is a lot to explain, you should read the documentation and check the basic examples before you try to do complex things like integrate to skinned models an so.

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