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Rich Brighton

Project creation in VS2010

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I'm learning and working on a C++ game development under windows. I started off using the Microsoft DirectX tutorial 4 as a starting point and modifying it. At one point, I decided I'd try compiling it under 64 bit and to my amazement it compiled first time. I've now got to the stage where before I proceed further I want to have a better understanding of what happens when I create a project. I'm happy for VS do things for me as long as I understand what its doing for me. So I opened a new empty project and started copying code across bit by bit. Again no problem compiling. Then I added a 64 bit solution platform to the project. But when I tried to compile it couldn't find xnamath.h, d3dx11.h, D3Dx10.h, but it can find windows.h.

Is there any resource that explains the details of project creation in VS2010?

I recently bought Ivor Horton's beginning Visual C++ 2010. It was very disappointing. Although 1200 pages long it gave me no details about the IDE that couldn't be quickly googled, it had virtually nothing on developing windows programmes outside of CLI and without MFCs. Its also rubbish as a C++ textbook as it doesn't even mention multiple inheritance.

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if you look at the project settings there is one called "VC++ Directories". This lists where your compiler goes to look for includes, libraries, etc. Look to see what is different about your app that compiles and the one that doesn't. Sounds like Direct X isn't there.

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Ah well, cheer yes I had already checked and the include line is different, so I could copy and paste, but I want to be able to write the include paths myself. I can't seem to find any proper documentation for visual studio. I created an empty project, but seemingly its not completely empty. It already has an include path for the 32bit directories but apparently not the 64 bit and they don't seemingly get added when you add a 64 bit solution platform to the project. Maybe that's just the way it works and you have to play around and use trial and error to find out how things work in VS, rather than there being any methodical documentation anywhere.

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