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phresnel

You Are Old ...

55 posts in this topic

heh in my teaching manual for a class it mentions floppy drives as a storage medium. This material is from 2008 which makes it hilarious. It's like they append a new date without paying attention to if the material is horribly out of date. I feel like keeping a floppy drive just to shock people. "Sorry I'm late for the presentation! Yeah I brought the powerpoint. It was large so I chained 6 floppies together. Problem?"

Also I don't know about your guys but I didn't hear about a zip drive until like the beginning of university when I got a job and found a zip drive reader in the back of a utility closet. "What is this piece of archaic technology?" My boss: "You see this was a form of data storage like the floppy disk. The university never really supported them. It could store a few 100 MB..." Apparently they never caught on in my high school since I never saw them.
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Hehe, nice one [img]http://public.gamedev.net/public/style_emoticons/default/smile.gif[/img]
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In the immortal words of wez in the linked StackOverflow topic, who is general failure, and why is he reading my disk?!
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I feel old because I had an A: and a B: drive. And I approve of every post in this thread.
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Yeah, I had a couple computers before there was such a thing as a hard drive in a home computer. You had whatever floppy, and the working memory, that's all. Oh, and the floppies were definitely NOT 3.5".
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[quote name='Evil Steve' timestamp='1294688437' post='4756821']
I feel old because I had an A: and a B: drive. And I approve of every post in this thread.
[/quote]

Luxury. We could only dream of having letters for our drives. Or colons. We did a LOAD "",8 and we were grateful for it.
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[quote name='Evil Steve' timestamp='1294688437' post='4756821']
I feel old because I had an A: and a B: drive. And I approve of every post in this thread.
[/quote]

I had only an A: drive, therefore I am just half as old. Otoh, I know this:

[img]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/52/Commodore-Datassette.jpg/736px-Commodore-Datassette.jpg[/img]


Oh yeah.


Us talking about floppy disks must be like when the bearded ones talk about punchcards et al, zomg.
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I can't believe we are quite that far along yet. The poster *must* have been asking rhetorically....surely......please?..... :o

@phresnel: Gotcha beat. I (still) have the cassette *and* the floppy drive (which cost more than the computer) for my C-64. I loved that machine.
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Haha - I'm only 19 years old but I used to use floppy drivers quite a bit.

I can remember the noise my 5.25" driver made while the PC was booting.

I hated that noise especially early mornings when I didn't want to wake my parents up since they would force me to turn the PC off and go to bed again.:-D
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[quote name='Mihulik' timestamp='1294694457' post='4756875']
I hated that noise especially early mornings when I didn't want to wake my parents up since they would force me to turn the PC off and go to bed again.:-D
[/quote]
Reminds me of the 56k modem. Whoever thought that not putting a volume control on those things was a good idea should die. I ended up ripping the speaker off. Still worked.
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When I built my current computer about 3 years ago now, I bought a new floppy drive (~5 bucks) for aesthetics. I'm so used it I couldn't let go :/

Consequently, I have yet to use it for anything heh.
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[quote name='Antheus' timestamp='1294689905' post='4756838']
[quote name='Evil Steve' timestamp='1294688437' post='4756821']
I feel old because I had an A: and a B: drive. And I approve of every post in this thread.
[/quote]

Luxury. We could only dream of having letters for our drives. Or colons. We did a LOAD "",8 and we were grateful for it.
[/quote]

This.
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No, guys, old is trying to describe punched cards to cow orkers when regaling them with tails of your undergrad days.
Young is knowing how to use the nibbler to get twice the storage out of your 5.25" floppies. [img]http://www.adpmods.com/case-modding/files/thumbnails/t_227.gif[/img]
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[quote name='Bregma' timestamp='1294842662' post='4757732']
Young is knowing how to use the nibbler to get twice the storage out of your 5.25" floppies.
[/quote]
Yep the similar trick worked for the 3.5". I just used a very sharp drill bit.


I still have a bunch of floppy drives lying around. And floppy disks of different physical sizes. One of the reasons I have them is because they were one of the most reliable ways of flashing firmware to DVD drives, and motherboards.
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Remember the times when floppy drive was a luxury and you would be the cool kid if you had one? Everybody else was spinning cassettes and praying that the program/game will load successfully this time (it often took a few minutes without Turbo)...

Geez, I feel like Methuselah now...
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[quote name='misi' timestamp='1294861919' post='4757910']
Remember the times when floppy drive was a luxury and you would be the cool kid if you had one? Everybody else was spinning cassettes and praying that the program/game will load successfully this time (it often took a few minutes without Turbo)...

Geez, I feel like Methuselah now...
[/quote]

I remember the days when if you had 2 5.25 floppy drives, it meant you could read AND write at the same time. Mind = Blown.
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