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LoopStan

What Dx Should I Use?

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I have been programming applications and games for a while using flash, C#, etc, and I know and am learning C++.

I learn by example and by doing, so I would like to create some simple graphics in Direct X.

I am curious however, on which version I should use. All the graphics are going to be 2D, so I won't be needing D3D unless it's recommended I learn how to do that for accelerated 2D games.

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Short answer-- if running on Vista or Win7, use D3D11. If not, D3D9, and why haven't you upgraded?

On the 2D/3D front, Direct2D is rather mediocre and DirectDraw has been deprecated for some time-- in short, Direct3D is really your only option. That being said, there are libraries that can abstract away the more complicated bits of 2D-on-3D for you depending on how far away you're willing to go from the 'raw' API.

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Short answer-- if running on Vista or Win7, use D3D11. If not, D3D9, and why haven't you upgraded?

On the 2D/3D front, Direct2D is rather mediocre and DirectDraw has been deprecated for some time-- in short, Direct3D is really your only option. That being said, there are libraries that can abstract away the more complicated bits of 2D-on-3D for you depending on how far away you're willing to go from the 'raw' API.


Not everyone has a GPU that supports D3D11. I run on Vista but my video card only supports up to D3D 10.1 for instance. And some people simply don't like vista or win7 enough to upgrade at the moment. Not to mention you'll reach a wider audience by at least supporting D3D9 still. Just because D3D11 is out there doesn't mean you have to immediately go for it. Of course eventually all of this will change.

To the OP - if you want to do some 2D games/apps, you should look at XNA (if you want to stick with C#). Don't need to tinker at all with regular directx and it does have some nice functionality that would make your life easier working with 2D.

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You can use the D3D11 API to target older hardware levels, including 9. Of course, to use D3D11 requires at least Vista, but if you're running a newer OS with an old card, you can still utilize D3D11.

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Not everyone has a GPU that supports D3D11. I run on Vista but my video card only supports up to D3D 10.1 for instance. And some people simply don't like vista or win7 enough to upgrade at the moment. Not to mention you'll reach a wider audience by at least supporting D3D9 still. Just because D3D11 is out there doesn't mean you have to immediately go for it. Of course eventually all of this will change.

To the OP - if you want to do some 2D games/apps, you should look at XNA (if you want to stick with C#). Don't need to tinker at all with regular directx and it does have some nice functionality that would make your life easier working with 2D.

Gekko mentioned this, but I'll reiterate-- you can run D3D11 on 9-level HW just fine, which is more than D3D10 can claim. Additionally, Steam hardware surveys put D3D9 hardware *and* XP in a pretty definite minority (<20%, if you can believe it!) these days. In short, there's really no reason to use D3D9 unless you're explicitly picking it.

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