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bdragoncat

What tools do you use to design a game?

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[size="4"]Hi guys ,

I'm just wondering about what tools do you use (or Suggest) for making a game?

I'm using Dev-C++ and SDL Library making some games for fun. It may not so
professional but they are free.

How about you?

https://sites.google.com/site/xrobot17/project-1

dw22.gif?height=158&width=200

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I use visual Studio express C# and C++. They are both free and are the best IDE I know of (That might be a personal opinion tho).

For art tools, I have expensive tastes :)

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I too use C++ and SDL; it's great for both 2D and 3D work with OpenGL. I haven't used an IDE in ages though. I run Linux mostly, so I just use Leafpad (a simple text editor) and a script that compiles everything I need using g++. The family computer runs Windows, and I haven't ever gotten around to switching to Code::Blocks, so just use Dev-C++ to see how my code runs on that platform. Once I finally get serious about releasing my project, I'm going to update though. Not too much love here for Dev-C++ as it's not particularly an up-to-date IDE.

For art, I use GIMP and Inkscape. Both are cross-platform and include enough tools to fiddle around with. I prefer GIMP mostly for sprite work whereas I use Inkscape to create detailed, smooth 2D graphics that get rasterized into my game. I have Photoshop on the family computer, but that's far too much beyond my humble needs.

Music is by far the most complicated; it requires several programs just to get anywhere and sound decent. Most of my programs are Linux specific, but here's just my most commonly used ones: QjackCtl, Qsynth (and simultaneously FluidSynth), Hydrogen, Rosegarden, amsynth, and Audacity. Let's not forget the heaps of soundfonts sitting around.

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I see no need to use a heavy-duty language when I can use a nimble one instead, so at home I mostly use Python and Pygame. Notepad++ and Idle for writing code, Paint.NET for creating images and pen and paper to work out (game-)design issues.

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I like QtCreator to program in, and I like Qt itself. I also use SFML, but SDL is pretty nice too.

Is there some sort of evil fairy which tricks all new game programmers into using Dev C++?

When I first started programming, the C++ book I purchased came with Dev C++ on a companion disc (C++ for Dummies, I think it was). I used it for the first 3 or 4 years of development, and I got so familiar with it, that changing to another IDE was scary. dry.gif

I tried Code::Blocks, and seemed like a decent alternative, but Visual Studio had so many interface buttons that I just uninstalled it and crawled back into my shell. Eventually, I upgraded from Dev C++ to just using MinGW directly via the command prompt, and then moved to Programmer's Notepad. Now I use QtCreator, even for non-QT stuff.

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