• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
bdragoncat

What tools do you use to design a game?

21 posts in this topic

[size="4"]Hi guys ,

I'm just wondering about what tools do you use (or Suggest) for making a game?

I'm using Dev-C++ and SDL Library making some games for fun. It may not so
professional but they are free.

How about you?

https://sites.google.com/site/xrobot17/project-1[/size]

[img]https://sites.google.com/site/xrobot17/_/rsrc/1249322465609/project-1/dynasty-war-ii/dw22.gif?height=158&width=200[/img]
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use visual Studio express C# and C++. They are both free and are the best IDE I know of (That might be a personal opinion tho).

For art tools, I have expensive tastes :)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[url="http://www.greatray.com/article/12/08/avoid-devcpp-programming/"]Avoid Dev-C++[/url]. Microsoft's [url="http://www.microsoft.com/express/Windows/"]Visual Studio Express[/url] is good. So is [url="http://www.codeblocks.org/"]Code::Blocks[/url]. The first link also mentions a couple others that I haven't tried.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I too use C++ and SDL; it's great for both 2D and 3D work with OpenGL. I haven't used an IDE in ages though. I run Linux mostly, so I just use Leafpad (a simple text editor) and a script that compiles everything I need using g++. The family computer runs Windows, and I haven't ever gotten around to switching to Code::Blocks, so just use Dev-C++ to see how my code runs on that platform. Once I finally get serious about releasing my project, I'm going to update though. Not too much love here for Dev-C++ as it's not particularly an up-to-date IDE.

For art, I use GIMP and Inkscape. Both are cross-platform and include enough tools to fiddle around with. I prefer GIMP mostly for sprite work whereas I use Inkscape to create detailed, smooth 2D graphics that get rasterized into my game. I have Photoshop on the family computer, but that's far too much beyond my humble needs.

Music is by far the most complicated; it requires several programs just to get anywhere and sound decent. Most of my programs are Linux specific, but here's just my most commonly used ones: QjackCtl, Qsynth (and simultaneously FluidSynth), Hydrogen, Rosegarden, amsynth, and Audacity. Let's not forget the heaps of soundfonts sitting around.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I see no need to use a heavy-duty language when I can use a nimble one instead, so at home I mostly use Python and Pygame. Notepad++ and Idle for writing code, Paint.NET for creating images and pen and paper to work out (game-)design issues.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[size="4"]Thanks for the advices.
I also heard about and downloaded a Microsoft's [url="http://www.microsoft.com/express/Windows/"]Visual Studio Express[/url] before.
But never got chance to use that.
I think this is a good time to move on now :)[/size]
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='yckx' timestamp='1295042336' post='4759028']
[url="http://www.greatray.com/article/12/08/avoid-devcpp-programming/"]Avoid Dev-C++[/url]. Microsoft's [url="http://www.microsoft.com/express/Windows/"]Visual Studio Express[/url] is good. So is [url="http://www.codeblocks.org/"]Code::Blocks[/url]. The first link also mentions a couple others that I haven't tried.
[/quote]

Is there some sort of evil fairy which tricks all new game programmers into using Dev C++?
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I like QtCreator to program in, and I like Qt itself. I also use SFML, but SDL is pretty nice too.[quote name='Jarwulf' timestamp='1295078729' post='4759200']
Is there some sort of evil fairy which tricks all new game programmers into using Dev C++?
[/quote]
When I first started programming, the C++ book I purchased came with Dev C++ on a companion disc ([b]C++ for Dummies[/b], I think it was). I used it for the first 3 or 4 years of development, and I got so familiar with it, that changing to another IDE was scary. [img]http://public.gamedev.net/public/style_emoticons/default/dry.gif[/img]

I tried Code::Blocks, and seemed like a decent alternative, but Visual Studio had so many interface buttons that I just uninstalled it and crawled back into my shell. Eventually, I upgraded from Dev C++ to just using MinGW directly via the command prompt, and then moved to [b]Programmer's Notepad[/b]. Now I use QtCreator, even for non-QT stuff.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Jarwulf' timestamp='1295078729' post='4759200']
[quote name='yckx' timestamp='1295042336' post='4759028']
[url="http://www.greatray.com/article/12/08/avoid-devcpp-programming/"]Avoid Dev-C++[/url]. Microsoft's [url="http://www.microsoft.com/express/Windows/"]Visual Studio Express[/url] is good. So is [url="http://www.codeblocks.org/"]Code::Blocks[/url]. The first link also mentions a couple others that I haven't tried.
[/quote]

Is there some sort of evil fairy which tricks all new game programmers into using Dev C++?
[/quote]


College
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The course I'm taking was nice and shipped me a free CD of VS 2008 (pretty sure it's the Express version).

I'm on a mac though so I went with Xcode anyway hahaha ;D
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Visual studio express is more than enought to create pretty much anything you need. There are lots of useful tools you should look at after you feel comfortable,one I strongly reommend is [url="http://www.cmake.org/"]CMake[/url] and their other support tools, easen the burden . But first, get used to VS Express (Code::Blocks is good too, but I strongly recommend VS).

SDL, SFML, or other multipurpose tools are good enough to start with. DirectX or OpenGL is only needed if you want to do some 3D stuff, yet I would recommend you to master 2D first.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Jarwulf' timestamp='1295078729' post='4759200']
[quote name='yckx' timestamp='1295042336' post='4759028']
[url="http://www.greatray.com/article/12/08/avoid-devcpp-programming/"]Avoid Dev-C++[/url]. Microsoft's [url="http://www.microsoft.com/express/Windows/"]Visual Studio Express[/url] is good. So is [url="http://www.codeblocks.org/"]Code::Blocks[/url]. The first link also mentions a couple others that I haven't tried.
[/quote]

Is there some sort of evil fairy which tricks all new game programmers into using Dev C++?
[/quote]

That's a good view point......
The first time I use Dev-C++ because its compact size 4.9mb , and easy to use.
Its not for professional , so you can get into it pretty soon. Just like you may enjoy
a small and fast handy tool rather than a big and complete , but complicate and slow
one.

But anyway , I will move into VS Express :)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='kilah' timestamp='1295089938' post='4759235']
Visual studio express is more than enought to create pretty much anything you need. There are lots of useful tools you should look at after you feel comfortable,one I strongly reommend is [url="http://www.cmake.org/"]CMake[/url] and their other support tools, easen the burden . But first, get used to VS Express (Code::Blocks is good too, but I strongly recommend VS).

SDL, SFML, or other multipurpose tools are good enough to start with. DirectX or OpenGL is only needed if you want to do some 3D stuff, yet I would recommend you to master 2D first.
[/quote]

You're right. After I tried SDL , I feel DirectX or OpenGL is hard to get into it.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Python, for the language. PyScripter, for the IDE. Panda3d, for the game engine. Photoshop for image editing. Blender for 3d modeling.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Captain P' timestamp='1295051474' post='4759083']
I see no need to use a heavy-duty language when I can use a nimble one instead, so at home I mostly use Python and Pygame. Notepad++ and Idle for writing code, Paint.NET for creating images and pen and paper to work out (game-)design issues.
[/quote]
Great reply, sir! I am the same exact way, I still use Paint to build basic components of my graphics & notepad for certain game writing, design, and note keeping.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually, Paint.NET is quite a bit more advanced than MS Paint - it's somewhere in-between Paint and Photoshop (and it's free). Layers, a proper history, effects, plugins... I wouldn't want to miss those anymore. ^_^ The same goes for Notepad++ - it's much better than plain old Notepad. Syntax coloring, auto-completion, tabbed interface, plugins (function list, explorer, diff tool)... it's more like a generic light-weight IDE than a text editor really.

Oh, forgot to mention - I'm using SVN for version control. I haven't put much thought into a backup strategy though so that mostly consists of mailing archives to myself, heh.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use Delphi 2009 (yup ObjectPascal dev alive here ), OpenOffice for the docs and calculations, UltraEdit for the xml, Lyx for the manual, a bit of photoshop and Maya + Mojoworld for the 3d. For the 3d dev i use mainly OpenGL.

For project updates i use a synch software + SVN/tortoise

when i need to compile C++ projects i use VS2010
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use C++ with a simple makefile and emacs. Gimp for image editing. Milkshape 3D for my crappy programmer models. OpenGL with SDL or GLUT are my choices for APIs. Any tools needed for editing my games I usually make myself. Putting together a 3D level designer has never been something I shy away from.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Sothh' timestamp='1295222422' post='4759850']
Python, for the language. PyScripter, for the IDE. Panda3d, for the game engine. Photoshop for image editing. Blender for 3d modeling.
[/quote]

How do you feel about programming in Python?
I mean , is it simple and easy to write the code compare to C , and how is the efficiency of CPU?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='farcodev' timestamp='1295277736' post='4760123']
I use Delphi 2009 (yup ObjectPascal dev alive here ), OpenOffice for the docs and calculations, UltraEdit for the xml, Lyx for the manual, a bit of photoshop and Maya + Mojoworld for the 3d. For the 3d dev i use mainly OpenGL.

For project updates i use a synch software + SVN/tortoise

when i need to compile C++ projects i use VS2010
[/quote]

I'm trying your game right now , 44.5mb wow.
Do you use only Delphi 2009 to write this game?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Servant of the Lord' timestamp='1295080754' post='4759209']
I like QtCreator to program in, and I like Qt itself. I also use SFML, but SDL is pretty nice too.[quote name='Jarwulf' timestamp='1295078729' post='4759200']
Is there some sort of evil fairy which tricks all new game programmers into using Dev C++?
[/quote]
When I first started programming, the C++ book I purchased came with Dev C++ on a companion disc ([b]C++ for Dummies[/b], I think it was). I used it for the first 3 or 4 years of development, and I got so familiar with it, that changing to another IDE was scary. [img]http://public.gamedev.net/public/style_emoticons/default/dry.gif[/img]

I tried Code::Blocks, and seemed like a decent alternative, but Visual Studio had so many interface buttons that I just uninstalled it and crawled back into my shell. Eventually, I upgraded from Dev C++ to just using MinGW directly via the command prompt, and then moved to [b]Programmer's Notepad[/b]. Now I use QtCreator, even for non-QT stuff.
[/quote]

If I don't wanna spend too much time on complicated library , do you think Code::Blocks is easy for me?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0