Sign in to follow this  

Looking for good C# books

This topic is 2489 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I would like to start by saying that I am not looking neither for a basic introduction to C# nor a BASIC introduction to game programming with C#. I am looking for something that assumes you already know a little about C# and explains some of the more challenging concepts related to making a game. to clarify things, however, I would like to say that when I say BASIC, I mean that the book assumes you know nothing whatsoever about C# and starts from there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='jniblick' timestamp='1298249187' post='4776845']
I would like to start by saying that I am not looking neither for a basic introduction to C# nor a BASIC introduction to game programming with C#. I am looking for something that assumes you already know a little about C# and explains some of the more challenging concepts related to making a game. to clarify things, however, I would like to say that when I say BASIC, I mean that the book assumes you know nothing whatsoever about C# and starts from there.
[/quote]

I don't think there are any C# game programming books... I could be wrong... but maybe you mean XNA? I have a few books. One "Building XNA 2.0 Games" (yeah, it's old and outdated) is great. I love it. I also have "Microsoft XNA Unleashed". It's definitely not for a new programmer. It was a bit over my head when first learning XNA.

But this is under the assumption that XNA is what you meant. If you mean pure C# or another game development library, you'll have to state so. I personally haven't read an XNA book that explains C# actually. (Which was a bit of a struggle going from C++ and allegro <.>) So you shouldn't have too much trouble finding one.

I'd recommend going to your local book store and looking specifically at the project that each book aims to have you make. Which ever ones sound more interesting, buy it. ^^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='jniblick' timestamp='1298253005' post='4776859']
You're totally right, I meant XNA. (Face Palm) I will check out the ones you suggested.
[/quote]

They are good books, but I learned a lot more by just taking apart the samples online. The books may be outdated, but then again they might have been republished. The first one is XNA 2.0, and the second one is XNA 3.0 I believe. And now we're on 4.0. Although, I haven't see too terrible of a difference in the API. The audio system is different in 3.0+. I refuse to use XACT, ug.

If you can understand the state manager example on the xna site, it'll be smooth sailing in any project you do.
[url="http://create.msdn.com/en-US/education/catalog/sample/game_state_management"]http://create.msdn.c...tate_management[/url]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='slynk' timestamp='1298253477' post='4776862']
They are good books, but I learned a lot more by just taking apart the samples online. The books may be outdated, but then again they might have been republished.
[/quote]

I would have to agree with slynk... Over the years I've been trying to learn some concepts in my spare time, I've spent a lot of money on books... but each time I find myself doing more research online than referencing a book. Unless you are sure you have the time to read and learn from the book while the material is still relevant, I would say you may be able to do without. I've actually found MSDN to be a very helpful reference lately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Stroan' timestamp='1298290083' post='4776989']
[quote name='slynk' timestamp='1298253477' post='4776862']
They are good books, but I learned a lot more by just taking apart the samples online. The books may be outdated, but then again they might have been republished.
[/quote]

I would have to agree with slynk... Over the years I've been trying to learn some concepts in my spare time, I've spent a lot of money on books... but each time I find myself doing more research online than referencing a book. Unless you are sure you have the time to read and learn from the book while the material is still relevant, I would say you may be able to do without. I've actually found MSDN to be a very helpful reference lately.
[/quote]

I hate MSDN for most thing but the XNA framework is well documented and I have had to use it to get specifics on function changes. A lot of examples online are still in 2.0, on MSDN you can click a function and at the top change the XNA version to see the changes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Several XNA 4.0 books came out in the past few months. They're all supposed to be quite good but they appear to teach XNA in slightly different ways. Go to Amazon and search for XNA 4.0 and you'll see them there in the top 5 results. I have the O'Reilly one with the ugly fish on the front and it's quite good for learning the basics. The one that's written by two of the authors of XNA (Miller and Johnson) is also supposed to be good and there's a slightly more expensive one (Jaegers) that looks like it has great example projects but doesn't cover 3D at all as far as I can tell. Take a look at the tables of contents and see which one would suit your learning style best, because as far as I can tell they're all great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 2489 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this