• Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Cloth modeling

This topic is 5981 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

What is the best way to model cloth when it is to be used in a real-time application, like a game? Thinking about Constraints, Collision, Physical vs Geometrical, Partical etc. To be used in a master thesis! Any other information about cloth simulation/modeling will be appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Guest Anonymous Poster
Fake it.

Animated sprite on a quad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Easier than it sounds. Set up a set of points, connect them by constraints, apply the applicable forces to the vertices (namely, gravity, Hooke''s law if you want elastic cloth, which is a bit slower and doesn''t contribute much visually, and immediate impulses from colliding objects; wind shear if you''re really bored), resolve the constraints (iterative relaxation works quite well, basically you satisfy each constraint by moving both vertices towards each other, and repeat the process about ten times for the object). There was an article by Jeff Lander about it, which I wouldn''t recommend due to the fact that his 16x16, or something like that, patch of cloth ran at like 5fps on a p2/300, and I had several 200x200 patches running full framerate at the time. Not trying to brag, just saying that his approach was horribly slow (he was using a few dozen links to compensate for elastic constraints, which are slower than rigid constraints to begin with.. didn''t make sense to me). There were also a couple of articles in the GDC2001 proceedings which are quite good, so you might want to check that out.

The easiest way to start off is to model rope dynamics first (same thing, fewer constraints), and then move on to cloth once the framework is in place and tested (it''s easier to test ropes, obviously). This also works like a charm for convex solid objects, the physics engine I''m working on right now at work calculates hair, cloth and rigid objects dynamics through the exact same pipeline.

-goltrpoat


--
Float like a butterfly, bite like a crocodile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks
A lot of good tips here. I have done quit a bit reading, but I will look into it a bit more on the things and ideas I have gotten here. Will need to digest this info first, but I will def. be back with some questions again later.
Special thanks to goltrpoat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement