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Most recent Visual Studio?

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What is the latest Visual Studio version available? I heard VStudio 2000 was going to be released, is it out yet? What the latest ServicePack for VC6?

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The latest version of Visual Studio is 6.0
The latest service pack is 5, I think.

The next version of Visual Studio will be Visual Studio .net.
The new version will be focus on web-development, but from what I have read, the C++ compiler will be prettymutch the same as in 6.0, but will come with an .net library.


Endre



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The C++ compiler in VS.NET is completly different. By default, it does not compile to native x86 code, but instead to the IL bytecode (like a C# program is compiled to). Also, memory manegement has been removed from the C++ language (i.e. no more delete operator) and moved into the virtual machine that the IL is run on.

Of course, you can turn this off, and compile to native instructions and no VM (hence you''ll need to use delete again) if you like. This will be the choice of game developers and those needing every last ounce of performance.

You can even mix and match native and IL code in the same program (aka managed and unmanaged code in VS.NET) if that''s what you want.

VS.NET is scheduled for release sometime at the end of this year. If you can wait, I suggest you do so. Not only are the compilers updated, but the IDE itself is so much better than the VS 6.0 one. It''s really quite cool!


codeka.com - Just click it.

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Yes, Visual Studio 6 is the current release, and they''re currently up to Service Pack 5, although there''s very little difference between sp4 and sp5 for C++ programmers.

According to MS, the compiler to ship with VS.net gave AOE2 a 10% speed increase without any source changes. It also supports CPU-specific routines (SSE, MMX, 3DNow! etc) for many common routines, which VC++ 6 didn''t have (unless you grabbed the Microsoft Processor pack and wrote your own routines, which was loads of fun ). The IDE is much better too.

Most game developers will use the "native" C++ compilation options. And more than likely, newbies won''t want to program for a VM. And I''m guessing that some applications programmers will want to keep their source fast too. So then, what is the point of a VM? As for garbage collection, I actually enjoyed writing my own generic GC library. But I guess most people are getting lazier today... including myself

I''ll probably buy and use it. I''m a sucker for new stuff, and I''ll give it a good workout. But as for C#, somebody''s going to have to convince me pretty well, because I know what java is like, and I can''t see myself (and many others) using a VM.

Just some thoughts...

Simon Wilson
XEOS Digital Development

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quote:
Original post by Dean Harding
The C++ compiler in VS.NET is completly different. By default, it does not compile to native x86 code, but instead to the IL bytecode (like a C# program is compiled to). Also, memory manegement has been removed from the C++ language (i.e. no more delete operator) and moved into the virtual machine that the IL is run on.

Of course, you can turn this off, and compile to native instructions and no VM (hence you''ll need to use delete again) if you like. This will be the choice of game developers and those needing every last ounce of performance.

You can even mix and match native and IL code in the same program (aka managed and unmanaged code in VS.NET) if that''s what you want.

VS.NET is scheduled for release sometime at the end of this year. If you can wait, I suggest you do so. Not only are the compilers updated, but the IDE itself is so much better than the VS 6.0 one. It''s really quite cool!


codeka.com - Just click it.


That''s actually not quite true, I''m using VC++ 7/.NET right now and the managed extensions aren''t forced on you at all, it compiles native C/C++ by default. It sort of makes sense because if you''re doing .NET development you''re probably going to use C# or VB instead as they''re higher level.

The interface is definitly cool , it eats a bit of memory but it''s worth it.

---------------------------
FaceHat Software -- Wear the hat.

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quote:
Original post by The Senshi
That''s actually not quite true, I''m using VC++ 7/.NET right now and the managed extensions aren''t forced on you at all, it compiles native C/C++ by default. It sort of makes sense because if you''re doing .NET development you''re probably going to use C# or VB instead as they''re higher level.

The interface is definitly cool , it eats a bit of memory but it''s worth it.



I have VS.Net Beta 2, myself and I love it.

If you look at the "New Project" page, under the C++ list item, there''s about 3 differnt Managed C++ application types and only one "Native C++ Application" listed - and it''s way down the bottom, so while you can write a native C++ application from scratch, it''s not really how MS want you to do things. I don''t know if those ATL projects compile to native code or not, as I haven''t tried them yet...

Anyway, maybe I was a bit misleading - you can write completely unmanaged code if you like (and you can even mix managed and unmanaged in the same program!). Also, as was mentioned, the unmanaged compiler does SSE and MMX and all those yummy things, too.

Oh yeah, and I tried compiling my big 15k line OpenGL game with VS.Net and it gave me a stop screen (that''s a BSOD under Win2k) I was quite surprised, actually. I mean, it''s just a compiler - what could it possible do that causes so much havoc? All I did was load my VC++ 6 project files, converted them to VS.Net (lucky I backed them up!) and hit F7 (I don''t like the new key configuration - keep it the same, I say!). Bang! Stop screen. I can''t remember what it said (and I don''t particularly want to try it again to find out...


codeka.com - Just click it.

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Stop errors in Win2k are a big deal...99.99% of the time they''re hardware issue''s. Could be a bad stick of RAM, overheating chip, etc etc...VS.NET is a "worst case" scenario for a lot of processes.

Try building the source with VS.NET on another box, and make sure you get the 2 service packs (put in the CD and "look for updates").



Epolevne

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