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Question about Computer Science degree

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Hey there i was just wondering how much your guy's problem solving skills increased after getting a degree in computer science. Does it really increase the way you think or does it remain the same from the start?

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I don't know that if I would say it taught me how to think, only that it gave me new tools to apply to problems and a base understanding of many common problems.

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Any good Computer Science program will improve your problem solving skills. There is a limit to this though because they must grade you, and are therefore restricted in the type of problems they can require. If you really want to get a lot out of any program (not just Computer Science) you really need to take some initiative. Find problems that you think are interesting and try to tackle them. Most professors will be glad to help even if the material is not related to your class.

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Eric the Red has it. For me, it wasn't just Computer Science that taught me how to solve problems (although it too taught me specific computer programming methods of solving problems), it was many of the other courses too. In particular, the Physics courses I had to take taught me how to think properly about how to solve ANY problem, not just computer related.

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For me it was the Discrete Math course, which I describe to people as "a class that required I turn the problem sideways in order to solve it". Combinatorial math, along with set and graph theories, made for some great mental growth. A good algorithms course doesn't hurt either. So the more you can pack in to your degree, the more you can benefit, but I'd answer your question with a "yes" for sure.

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If any experience doesn't impact the way you think about relevant matters, especially one which lasts anywhere from two to eight years (or more), then you've got bigger problems than going to university can solve.

Seriously, what you've just asked is "Hey guys, do you think learning things will make me smarter?" -- of course it will. The question is not will learning make you smarter, but whether you are willing to learn (as in, possessing the humility to accept new information, the intelligence to extrapolate and internalize it, and the gumption to put in the hard work).

If you are willing and able to learn, then it is impossible to come out the same on the other side unless you utterly fail to follow through. Get an education and make the most of it.

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For me it was the Discrete Math course, which I describe to people as "a class that required I turn the problem sideways in order to solve it". Combinatorial math, along with set and graph theories, made for some great mental growth. A good algorithms course doesn't hurt either.

I had the exact opposite experience. All the material in the discrete math course was just a rehash of topics I had covered previously, and the algorithms course had me bored to tears... YMMV.

So the more you can pack in to your degree, the more you can benefit, but I'd answer your question with a "yes" for sure.[/quote]
QFT. But don't overlook courses outside the sciences. The philosophy department in particular usually has some very nice courses in formal logic, and that is definitely a good kick with regards to problem solving skills.

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Thanks for the input guys. I am definitely going to put hard work into all of my courses. I was also wondering if any of you guys have ever wanted to change your major during college for computer science because it was difficult, (kind of off topic) but i am really curious.

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Thanks for the input guys. I am definitely going to put hard work into all of my courses. I was also wondering if any of you guys have ever wanted to change your major during college for computer science because it was difficult, (kind of off topic) but i am really curious.

I personally never had this issue, because I was fairly accomplished at programming by the time I entered university. But a rough estimation suggests that 3/4 of our freshman in CS switch to another major after the first semester, perhaps 1/2 of the remaining students switch major after the second semester - and a few even switch majors later in the game.

Now, don't let that discourage you: almost all who switch away in the first year only picked CS in the first place because it was a 'hip' major with great salary potential, and they find they have little or no aptitude for it.

As long as you have some talent, a little bit of drive, and a willingness to learn by yourself outside of class, you should do just fine.

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