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A brief history of C and computer programming?

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Let me know if there's questions or if this is relevant.

When I started, there was x86 assembler.exe program as one programming option. It had a number of instructions, each with a literal piece of hardware mapped to it. They did the things computers do best/fastest/first, things like adding numbers and storing them in memory, subtracting, bitshift, nothing too fancy. There were lots of hardware specific functions, and the mainboard and processor used the instructions binary interpretations as wire signals to hardware, making each instruction a beautiful and unique snowflake modeled in hard wires and "transistors", which can apparently be printed in layers with an inkjet-printer like device, except it squirts out tiny pieces of liquid metal and other materials at a silly resolution (might keep looking different, the new ones are made with the old ones, and it can print other stuff too....plus the cost in materials is low, although processors need ultradeep metals spun multiple times thru a supercollider (nuclear metal) to make it even harder than any mined metal, they need very little and it's not too expensive, plus there's hot lava at the bottom that makes for good electric generation to run the spinners, plus all the good fuels and materials are down there, and nuclear spinning works on all the popular stuff, like the explosive powder and fuels, metals, even stones and rubbers and plastics, but those are less popular than the metals & fuels.....some insulators and random other stuff too, all printable in layers or with even fancier tricks, all based on computers and made with only pre-existing things, in the ways of things here.


Basic was available at the time too. I knew some basic, but it was slow, but very easy to use compared to making useful stuff with assembly, very tricky. I was reaching some limits with basic, and was learning assembly from bill. I wrote a basic program to write the assembly faster. It has a few parts. The .a resource files I made had some variable swap stuff and weren't used....(long time ago, near 93, also made multitasking kernel at same time)..it was used for the variable swapper part of the code, and the assembler I was using was hand modified (it was written in assembly and built with an older version, when bill started there weren't OSes and programmers lined up the magnetic bits for the processor, the equil is making punch cards, using punch/no punch as bits to define instructions, then making series of them, dropping wires through the hole, and wiring up the instructions to work, then using that to make fancier ones. The computer started out as missile/rocket guidance at great range, with attached sensors and motors to steer, also those big cannons and radar/radio tricks too. They were later used for civil purposes, including luxury entertainment, virtual sparring, business coordination, and more, set to replace many other inventions like paper, tv, magazines....the future is computers since they do everything all the old stuff does and more. They also probably won't kill us with random malfunctions for a while, so don't worry about that, they're just our friendly new hammer.

Anyways the variable swap let me use lots of variables instead of just manually using the registers and swapping them out with ram, since there were only like 16 registers, I also noticed it was hard to optimize. Bill helped with this, and afterwards you could write an .a file with normal instructions, except all the $3 and $5 to refer to specific registers could be $myvar1 and $bob3, if there were less than # registeres the script just replaced each one with a specific register, but if there were more there was some fancy code in the script and assember to efficiently swap stuff out. It also worked on precompiled handwritten assembly programs (.exe files on the computer, it's easy to see the binary instructions as x86 instructions, and also very powerful, but modern programs are gnarly and the instructions are hard to comprehend without commenting....and even with it's hard)....anyways that was the .a part, then the .b files defined the first functions, ...also note the primites were defined with .a, just "int" at first with the others coming later. The .b files had the c-notation of function name(parameters) { } code, except in .b files nothing is allowed except the function name and the asm {} tag, and more people filled in the first "functions" like printf and whatnot with the assembly "asm" code, being allowed to use the named variables. The .c files allowed the use of functions, and also allowed variable wrappers (structs), implemented in the basic script recursively. ".h" files are technically .c files, with the difference being purely for the programmer's design. #include and #define existed here, along with #ifndef for loading all the files needed in the tree, they all could # include and all the .a files got read in automagically with the .exe being run. The basic script then did a find & replace with some tricks, so that the end result was functions like "int i; set(i,5);add(3,i,i);print(i);", which would have been 5000 lines of assembly (not quite but still a huge thing to print a number for a quick calculation), and these programs at longer sizes were apparently more optimal than average human made assembly programs, which usually sacrified speed for making it work and not break due to complexity.

I then wrote a dos program that had an assembly access point that was generic at could run multiple programs in "c" at the same time, provided they were all written together, so I bundled it and uploaded it to prodigy for all, then there was some kind of backdating race over the patent but we won that too and computers work good now and have mostly been uncensored and free.

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I don't really see its relevance, not in the forums. It might be a candidate for your developer journal, or other blog. It is a little long and rambling, and doesn't really give any history on C or computer programming, except your own experience. Maybe that is what you intended, but the title doesn't hint at it. A better title might be "the history of my ASM/C translator programs", or something.

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Yeah okay, hopefully it shows how stuff is made? Anyways, I think programming is neat and more people should do it, plus it'll probably keep getting bigger and more powerful in the future with more better tools, that more people can make. :) I don't have a developer blog, and most sites won't let me write on their stuff. :( I'm very unpopular, sorry about that, but I think I add enough value here that they put up with me? Also anyone else notice that gas is way up but nobody mentioned the laws added during the gulf oil spill? I think they banned a ton of oil drilling, and now prices and gas is getting more expensive. This gigantic mining thing is a huge issue. Gigantic mines are currently "privately" owned, by corporations, investors, money, paperwork, and a few elected individuals. They control lots of money and mining, and can bribe laws and have other neat powers. The mine itself is immensely powerful, and not easily created again without using tools from another one, and even then it's hard. The earth is huge, and I think the people who own the mines now don't want to share the riches of the earth, so they lie and say more mines = everybody dies, and also they use their resources to frame other miners and try and monopolize for financial reasons...we need to know how the mines are, to see how big the 'earth' really is and what the deep layers are composed of, people don't think about what the earth looks like at 5 feet deep, much less 500 or 5000, but the dirt gives way to valuable clay pretty fast and nobody knows, and I wonder why mining is completely unknown to all in any way, when most people would pick up a little no matter what and all those I told were interested and most died at first for it. :( Anyways computers are deeply connected to tools, mines, cities, humans, and history, and I feel as though people need to go from lying at a desk and acting and doing nothing productive, to space travel, with maybe an easy mid-range step of making computer scripts and whatnot.....making stuff is kind of a generic skill, kind of copying the known inventions and known modding styles when that info is freely available, and lots of it being profession-locked as per warcraft, where you are only allowed to know a little to keep the nukes secret? This is the wrong way, people need to be free to try lots of stuff, and the stuff is all connected and there's less than there appears...and making games, to make them good, one really needs to understand what a computer is, and also how the world is, for a 'game' is kind of a neat, new-existant product....I mean there was chess a long time ago, the one that survived, maybe some ancestors to chess that died like go or whatever, most of that stuff is financial and not ruthlessly accurate...but software is totally dynamic and powerful, and can do more than make pictures on a screen....to understand that the programm instructions can control motors and sensors too, and that the wires can be connected to anything that exists, either through robot hands or through electric wiring, or though new mechanisms secret or undiscovered, understanding the key link between the computer programming and the physical world is key and a part of the above post, and should hopefully expand programmers abilities to do neat things with comptuers, both in the name of 'gaming', which might be casual simulations of things, and might mean a lot of things, with different games being different kinds of things or not, and business software and government police/law software and mining organization software are all pieces of the world and things, and all new and developable, but it seems like the progress is slow and the diversity low, and I want to change that.

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Also sorry about the length and rambling, I write like I talk for speed and because if you're good at reading 'old style' english, it's faster to read and easier to understand this way. I make short posts too, but I frequently have more to say than I feel like saying, and I hope my long post wasn't either redundant or unreadable....if someone wants to carefully read, understand, and re-write it I would be very appreciative.

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This site gives you a journal for free. Click on your user name in the top left and there should be a link to "My Journal", which you can post such things in. There are plenty of places you can create free blogs, such as wordpress.com.

The forums are for mainly for technical discussion, with some exceptions including the lounge.

Your posts could do with more paragraphs to keep them readable. But the main thing they suffer from is bouncing all over the place. They are really hard to follow and you digress and digress again. If you want to rant about mining or the price of fuel don't do it in a thread about programming, it makes no sense; the topics are unrelated. I would make two blog posts about these topics, had I something to say about them.

Clarity and brevity would add much to your writing style. Knowing what to exclude is often the key to simple, understandable writing.

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Regardless of any critique to the content or style of the article, this post came up on my front page Google News under my "Computer Programming" section. That's pretty cool :)

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Also anyone else notice that gas is way up but nobody mentioned the laws added during the gulf oil spill? ... This gigantic mining thing is a huge issue. ... The earth is huge, and I think the people who own the mines now don't want to share the riches of the earth, so they lie ... tools, mines, cities, humans, and history ... space travel ... computer scripts and whatnot ... warcraft ... nukes ... chess ... robot hands ......


Seriously, I know I'm not adding anything constructive by saying this, but did you know the game programming forum is where people seek guidance on making computer games?

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Ok. So when you will be at the point you start to write about your game, make a sign :).
(interesting opinions though).

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