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Is this an isometric engine? (youtube vid)

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Hi I'm new here!
I obviously have no clue what I am talking about but I found this neat project some person is doing and I thought if I could get myself such a set up I could have a lot of designing fun.
So here is the vid: [url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YML3SP5cHKQ"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=YML3SP5cHKQ[/url]
Does anyone know what this person had created? Is it fully 3d? If it is fully 3d and he is using meshes then isn't he wasting polygon faces on the sides every time he groups them?

Thanks!

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Its probably a 2d tiled isometric engine. But even if it was 3d there are programming techniques for scene management so that he is not wasting any polygons.

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Drawing back faces in a scene like that would be pretty trivial, if it was done in 3D. A lot of the time it is just better to throw things at the graphics card and let it sort things out, rather than worrying about the fine grained details. I could imagine such optimizations might make sense on low-spec hardware, but that probably isn't the average case.

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Thanks for the answers both of you! I also messaged the owner and he'll probably answer me sometime but I just got excited seeing how cool this is.

I will post here his answer if he answers me.

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If you watch closely, the character later on in the video appears to be polygonal by the way it rotates and moves smoothly -- its possible that it was animated that way, but fairly unlikely. If the character is polygonal, it stands to reason that the world is "real" 3D as well. Its also actually quite a bit easier to do isometric in "real" 3D using an isometric projection, rather than to fake it with flat tiles (in "real" 3D, you can use polygonal "tiles" for lack of a better term). When you fake it with flat tiles you have to jump through all sorts of hoops to deal with depth and "tall" objects (or holes) -- in "real" 3D everything just works.

The particle effects on the splashes are square as well, which wouldn't make much sense if they were hand-drawn.

That's just an educated guess though.

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Though I agree it's most certainly 3D, I didn't see any parallax (apparent changing of relative position). That implies it's an orthographic projection.

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