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How much maths needed to understand papers

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I am about to dedicate some time to get my maths up scratch.
Can anyone tell me how far I should study? And what topics are not very useful for this field.
My goal is to read and understand papers that are found in books like shaderx7

Thanks

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[quote name='wildboar' timestamp='1300579580' post='4788097']
I am about to dedicate some time to get my maths up scratch.
Can anyone tell me how far I should study? And what topics are not very useful for this field.
My goal is to read and understand papers that are found in books like shaderx7

Thanks
[/quote]
Pick up a linear algebra book. Most graphics programming is really heavy on the affine transformation math (matrix/vector/quaternion).

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Thanks for reply.
I already do have a good book on linear algebra, and I know
quite a bit of it but I always see the intergral/integrate symbol that looks like f
I know thats from calculus but I dont know how deep inside it is.

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[quote name='wildboar' timestamp='1300615842' post='4788188']
Thanks for reply.
I already do have a good book on linear algebra, and I know
quite a bit of it but I always see the intergral/integrate symbol that looks like f
I know thats from calculus but I dont know how deep inside it is.
[/quote]

If you were to do, say, a first course in calculus, you'd be learning about derivatives almost as soon as you started. My guess is you'd run into integrals around midterms. So, not super deep. You can totally learn it on your own.

My only recommendation is to study physics at the same time. That'll motivate the calculus [i]a lot[/i].

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You will probably also need multi-variate calculus since in graphics and physics you often have to integrate on 2 or 3 dimensional domains (for example on surfaces).

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I'm also have a lack of knowledge in calculus. I'm reading Eberly, Mitrich, other papers but I can't understand so deep as I want. Could you advise really good book on high mathematica ('high mathematica' - it's name of discipline that lectures in university in Russia), with good explanation of integrals, differentials (all that chain rules etc.).

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[quote name='Volgogradetzzz' timestamp='1300691413' post='4788543']
I'm also have a lack of knowledge in calculus. I'm reading Eberly, Mitrich, other papers but I can't understand so deep as I want. Could you advise really good book on high mathematica ('high mathematica' - it's name of discipline that lectures in university in Russia), with good explanation of integrals, differentials (all that chain rules etc.).
[/quote]

How about [url="http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/#mathematics"]this?[/url]

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There is no exact answer to your question. Papers are usually written about a technical subject, so you should be familiar with the terminology and also the concepts. Even though I'm superior at math, I do sometimes search about the material that I don't have a clue.

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