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arski

Yeah we're scalin' on up!

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Hi guys.

I'm working on an idea for an online multi-player game (I know, I know). It's real-time isometric 2 1/2D. The game isn't very ambitious in terms of graphics, storyline or quests. But it is ambitious with how viscerally in-control the player is of his character. With character control, open-world combat and behavior influence as the core, everything else is built around that..

It's very easy to shrink this concept and strip away non-essentials. What would be left at its core is character movement and pk skills on a tilemap.

Essentially, an isometric 2 1/2D street fighter in a marginally larger combat arena.

Is this a feasible strategy, to keep scaling up, and potentially decuple your workload, depending on what needs to be redesigned from scratch? Publishing something like this will allow for a lot of metrics and gauging of interest and feedback. It also gives us a portfolio and something tangible when looking for investment.

The question is, is this feasible?

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You want to attract investors just with plain design about core mechanics and nothing more ? That's probably a dead-end.
There are two types of approach when delivering your idea to a publisher. Check this out: http://whatgamesare.com/2011/03/visual-vs-action-oriented-design-game-design.html

But basically if you can make a sample visual gameplay with just the core mechanics maybe you'll be able to attract some investors.

Distributed workload is a good idea but when we speak about balancing issues, not just designing from scratch up. If you want to experiment with a different approach about designing things is good but keep it to yourself don't tell the publisher/investor that you have only core mechanics such as "A is for kick, B for punch. i dunno how much damage as points is afflicted"


P.S. Probably i didn't understand correctly ^_^

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[quote name='altras' timestamp='1302858043' post='4798704']
You want to attract investors just with plain design about core mechanics and nothing more ? That's probably a dead-end.
P.S. Probably i didn't understand correctly ^_^
[/quote]
Is that really what the OP said? He wants to get investors and all he has is a design? No business plan? That will never wash. To get investors, one needs a business plan.

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[quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1302894908' post='4798878']
[quote name='altras' timestamp='1302858043' post='4798704']
You want to attract investors just with plain design about core mechanics and nothing more ? That's probably a dead-end.
P.S. Probably i didn't understand correctly ^_^
[/quote]
Is that really what the OP said? He wants to get investors and all he has is a design? No business plan? That will never wash. To get investors, one needs a business plan.
[/quote]

Or stupid investors.

Work on your systems and concepts, document everything, and start building your plan that details how and why you will make money with your system.

As for an isometric fighting game, I think you'll need to do some mockup art to clearly demonstrate what your vision is.

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To clarify-

The original game concept is MMO-sized. But it's possible for me to scale it down to just pure small-scale PvP/PvE that can be used on smaller platforms (iPhone, for example).

It's easier to get started small, and if it succeeds on the iPhone, you have a working game concept/design, and a successful game which is more alluring to potential investors.

Is this a feasible path to a large-scale game?

In other words, starting with a small-scale game with an eye towards expanding size and scope.

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[quote name='arski' timestamp='1303090925' post='4799694']
It's easier to get started small, and if it succeeds on the iPhone, you have a working game concept/design, and a successful game which is more alluring to potential investors.

Is this a feasible path to a large-scale game?
[/quote]
Yes, but you still need a business plan.

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[quote name='Luckless' timestamp='1302916476' post='4798993']
[quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1302894908' post='4798878']
[quote name='altras' timestamp='1302858043' post='4798704']
You want to attract investors just with plain design about core mechanics and nothing more ? That's probably a dead-end.
P.S. Probably i didn't understand correctly ^_^
[/quote]
Is that really what the OP said? He wants to get investors and all he has is a design? No business plan? That will never wash. To get investors, one needs a business plan.
[/quote]

Or stupid investors.

Work on your systems and concepts, document everything, and start building your plan that details how and why you will make money with your system.

As for an isometric fighting game, I think you'll need to do some mockup art to clearly demonstrate what your vision is.
[/quote]

Unfortunatly stupid investors tend to run out of money very quickly and thus finding them is really difficult.

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