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zealkaiser

what compiler and libraries to use.

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Hello guys!
I am building a game engine in which the game will be written in lua script.
I am using c++ and opengl for game engine. Initially, I want it to run on windows.

I am confused what compiler to use visual studio or mingw.
Also, I am confused which library to use for window purpose sdl, sfml, glut, glfw or something else.

Any suggestions.

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For windowing/events, SDL, SFML, or GLFW should be suitable. If you use SDL you'll need to decide whether to use 1.2.x or 1.3. For more info on (and comparisons of) these APIs, just search the forums, as the topic is discussed fairly frequently.

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thanks for reply.
I want to make professional games.
That' the reason i am concerned about libraries and compiler.
How do professional games are made. I mean what libraries and compiler and ide they use.

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I want to make professional games.
That' the reason i am concerned about libraries and compiler.
How do professional games are made. I mean what libraries and compiler and ide they use.

It doesn't matter -- it isn't your choice of IDE & compiler or the libraries that you use that will effect whether or not your games seem professional, it will be your skill as a programmer and the quality of the assets used, as well as of course the design of the actual games. Professionals learn to use a wide range of tools, and are often required to pick up new tools or libraries in a short period of time, so you should just use whatever you feel most comfortable with.

My personal recommendations would be to use Visual Studio and either SFML or SDL.


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[quote name='Suyash Mohan' timestamp='1304134254' post='4804636']
I want to make professional games.
That' the reason i am concerned about libraries and compiler.
How do professional games are made. I mean what libraries and compiler and ide they use.

It doesn't matter -- it isn't your choice of IDE & compiler or the libraries that you use that will effect whether or not your games seem professional, it will be your skill as a programmer and the quality of the assets used, as well as of course the design of the actual games. Professionals learn to use a wide range of tools, and are often required to pick up new tools or libraries in a short period of time, so you should just use whatever you feel most comfortable with.

My personal recommendations would be to use Visual Studio and either SFML or SDL.
[/quote]
Thanks for your advice. I am trying my best to be more professional with my project as I have decided to choose software development as my profession. At present I am a student of computer science engineering

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[quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1304148717' post='4804685']
[quote name='Suyash Mohan' timestamp='1304134254' post='4804636']
I want to make professional games.
That' the reason i am concerned about libraries and compiler.
How do professional games are made. I mean what libraries and compiler and ide they use.

It doesn't matter -- it isn't your choice of IDE & compiler or the libraries that you use that will effect whether or not your games seem professional, it will be your skill as a programmer and the quality of the assets used, as well as of course the design of the actual games. Professionals learn to use a wide range of tools, and are often required to pick up new tools or libraries in a short period of time, so you should just use whatever you feel most comfortable with.

My personal recommendations would be to use Visual Studio and either SFML or SDL.
[/quote]
Thanks for your advice. I am trying my best to be more professional with my project as I have decided to choose software development as my profession. At present I am a student of computer science engineering
[/quote]

The only criteria for being a professional is that you make money doing it and as such you should use the tools that allow you to put out the best possible product at the lowest possible cost, (Sometimes this means using expensive tools to save time, sometimes it means rolling your own or using free tools to save money (and quite often the best tools for a specific job are free), The main thing that tends to separate hobby projects from successful commercial projects is polish. Hobby projects tend to focus on features which keeps them in nearly constant development, adding new cool features is fun, adding that last bit of polish is time consuming and boring.

Thus my best advice is: once you got enough features done, freeze, focus on the polish until its 100% done then release, and if you happen to get any bright ideas for new cool features during the polish phase (You will probably get tons of bright ideas for new cool features during that phase since its a long ass boring grind) save them for the sequel/expansion.

It can help to have a second project in the prototype or early development stages to switch to for short periods while you polish your first project to avoid getting completely burned out.

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