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LeightonLuckey

Radial Attack and Movement System

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Hi, I was wondering if you could point me in the direction of any games that use a radial based system for movement and attack. I've seen this used many times successfully in various analog games, and I've heard of a few digital games, but I was wondering why it is not seen more? What do you think are the draw backs and advantages to using either system?

If you don't know what I mean here is an example image from the GDD I'm writing. I'm no artist though. dry.gif
greatsword.jpg


Thank you! If you have any other questions feel free to ask.

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The choice between grid or radial doesn't make much sense to me. In computer games very few modern RPGs are based on either, instead they allow for a more open world.

Many hack-and-slash RPGs use sword arcs like you describe, and either use arcs or rings around the player for magical effects. Diablo used them, as did a huge number of spin-offs from the game. Look at any of the spin-offs anywhere in the spectrum from Sacred to Hellgate :) and you'll see arcs and rings similar to what your pictures show.

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I'm sorry, I left out key words there. I was specifically talking about a turn based strategy/tactical game, like Final Fantasy, Tactics Ogre, or the more recent Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon.

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Phantom Brave and Makai Kingdom are 2 RPG that used a similar system. It has some advantages for being closer to reality, but it suffers from many drawbacks like making it hard to create unit walls to protect weaker members and requiring fiddling whenever you cast some area of effect spell to make sure you include as many enemies as you can.

Personally, I prefer the grid in tactical RPGs. It allows me to quickly see and analyze the battlefield because everything is separated in tiles of equal size. I know what can happen if I move to a specific location because the movement range is a low integer value. For area of effect spells, it's easy to visualize a + shape on the battlefield and immediately know which units will be affected. Figuring the same with a bunch of invisible spheres is a much harder task.

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Figuring the same with a bunch of invisible spheres is a much harder task.
I daresay that's exactly the reason it's a good idea.

A quick note, as a martial artist with some weapons experience, the 'idea' that swinging a sword through a 90 degree arc means you will effectively damage anyone in that arc is somewhat flawed. In practical styles of weapon use, there is an area in space roughly twelve inches across where your weapon has both maximum momentum and your body is mechanically aligned to back the weapon with your maximum generatable force. If the weapon strikes something before that, you must choose between delivering a glancing blow or being knocked off balance. If it strikes something after the effective region it will certainly be a glancing blow, because you are in the process of changing its momentum to deal with whatever situation is going to develop. Having a larger effective region is actually typical of an unskilled fighter, because it is wasteful in terms of speed and power, and exposes the combatant to counterattacks.

This all comes about because combat between skilled fighters is more often a game of speed and positioning than a game of force, and you want to deliver a blow with maximum force exactly 'there' and then quickly prepare for the next situation. Interestingly enough, stabbing (a straight forward thrust) is one of the most stable attack motions; it's effective region starts just after the hip and lasts all the way through the extension of the arm.

I suppose that from a game development perspective this stuff may seem a little pedantic, but it's something to consider.

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What do you think are the draw backs and advantages to using either system? [/quote]
[color=#1C2837][size=2]

For paper RPGs and board games I generally I prefer hex boards. Seeing a circular range of influence feels more real to me.

All of the pros and cons that I can list boil down to handling corners of the world.

Dealing with corner-cases allows players to exploit the environment and it feels like cheating. Why should the game let me hit the far ends of two boxes, but not hit the near corner of the box between them? Why will it let me travel so much faster through the world at an angle? Why does the entire square count as one so you cannot hide behind a corner?

The square corners don't stop me from playing games like Descent, but it does feel wrong that you can miss a fire blast because of a corner, or conversely cannot dodge it by being around a hall corner. Of course, the edge cases are still out there in games like Heroscape that use hex tiles and linear height, but ... it's a game and not real life.


Also I agree with Symphonic on being too near or too far and have seen that used in several games. If you can't handle deflecting and glancing blows and balancing, then if the thing you contact is pre-target or post-target there should be some penalty.

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