• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
DonWon

Difficulty of upgrading an existing games graphics

2 posts in this topic

I am trying to upgrade the graphics engine using the source for a small game made around 2003. It uses OpenGL 1.1 I believe. I am not an expert at programming in C++ by any means, but with good advice and a place to start I think I can pull it off. I know I will need to use shaders but honestly that is the only thing I know about this project. I want to add parallax occlusion mapping if possible. Any advice is welcomed (unless your advice is to give up!)

Thanks in advance,
DJ
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
parallax occlusion mapping is pretty much one of the last things you should concern yourself with right now, sure it's neat, but what you need to begin doing is first geometry rendering or making sure your using VBOs and things like that to make it really fast and solid, secondly you need to focus on the high visibility stuff or what is still going to be visible is you stand really really far away from the monitor (or squint with your eyes really hard).
That usually mean lights, shadows and textures.
Beyond that i can't tell you any specifics without seeing the old game and knowing a little about your graphical ambitions (creating a mock-up of what you want in blender/lightwave/maya/max will help you a lot with that).
But in general for the generic 3d game i would today recommend deferred rendering with depth shadow maps and post process filters (you can skip the deferred part if you only use one or two lights or have very basic lighting).

The most important bit is to take it one step at a time, preferably without breaking the rest
So
1. get the geometry sorted out first
2. figure out how the lights are going to work individually and accumulate them into an FBO
3. make sure all of the different parts are up to date (you wouldn't want your textures to suffer because your not using anisotropic filtering)
4. try and make it all work together at once, the way you know this is done is when you have an elegant solution with few or no workarounds.
5. now you can do stuff like parallax mapping

Another thing you do need to take in consideration is that a game will look better if it plays better so it would be wise to work on improving the gamecode over all and upgrade all parts of it, everything from input handling to physics to AI to sound, try and improve it all if you can that is.
And don't forget to upgrade you actual game data.

But please ask if there is anything specifically (additional information would be great in that case)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='lc_overlord' timestamp='1304552025' post='4806652']
parallax occlusion mapping is pretty much one of the last things you should concern yourself with right now, sure it's neat, but what you need to begin doing is first geometry rendering or making sure your using https://www.thangmmo.com/s and things like that to make it really fast and solid, secondly you need to focus on the high visibility stuff or what is still going to be visible is you stand really really far away from the monitor (or squint with your eyes really hard).
That usually mean lights, shadows and textures.
Beyond that i can't tell you any specifics without seeing the old game and knowing a little about your graphical ambitions (creating a mock-up of what you want in blender/lightwave/maya/max will help you a lot with that).
But in general for the generic 3d game i would today recommend deferred rendering with depth shadow maps and post process filters (you can skip the deferred part if you only use one or two lights or have very basic lighting).

The most important bit is to take it one step at a time, preferably without breaking the rest
So
1. get the geometry sorted out first
2. figure out how the lights are going to work individually and accumulate them into an FBO
3. make sure all of the different parts are up to date (you wouldn't want your textures to suffer because your not using anisotropic filtering)
4. try and make it all work together at once, the way you know this is done is when you have an elegant solution with few or no workarounds.
5. now you can do stuff like parallax mapping

Another thing you do need to take in consideration is that a game will look better if it plays better so it would be wise to work on improving the gamecode over all and upgrade all parts of it, everything from input handling to physics to AI to sound, try and improve it all if you can that is.
And don't forget to upgrade you actual game data.

But please ask if there is anything specifically (additional information would be great in that case)
[/quote]

Awesome information! It has given me a lot more to think about. In general the game only has one light source (the sun), however it appears there are other light sources (torches etc) but they dont effect the shadow. Honestly I dont think the "shadow" is actually effected by light dynamically at all. There is a Korean company that has opened a server, I can pm you the link if you like or I can post screen shots. The game has a camera similar to Diablo except this game has an actual 3d space, so I havent really noticed if the game has anisotropic filtering or not.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0