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Adderly

Learning Multiple Languages

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Adderly    103
I've just begun to really dive into the programming world, and I've skimmed across both C++ and Java in an effort to decide what language best suits my learning habits. It's my understanding that once I learn one language, some others will be easier to pick up. My question is, would any of you consider it futile or even counter productive to learn to learn two languages at once? I've been reading Bruce Eckel's "Thinking in C++ 2nd Edition" and David J. Eck's "Java Notes Version 5" ([url="http://math.hws.edu/javanotes/"]Java Notes[/url]) and ever so often, I'll take a code sample from one of the two and try to write it in both languages. Is this generally a good idea or should I focus all of my attention toward one or the other? For the most part (and for now, as I'm still working within the confinements of console applications in C++ and haven't really gotten into the use of libraries yet) I'm pretty sufficient in pulling code from the Java book and duplicating it in C++ and vise versa, but I'm wondering if I'll come to a point when I get into libraries where this will come to a halt. Any input on the situation would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.




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PREDATOR_UK    102
You need to concentrate all your effort in to one programming language that sorted. When you have done that then you can start moving on to different languages such as Java. This is the hardest part of learning programming, not going off course. My suggestion is that you stick with the one and have the other for when you are confident with the first. However if you feel like you are making good progress in both languages at the same time then by all means carry on, but you have to ask your self whether you are just learning the language or REALLY LEARNING it and UNDERSTANDING it. Hope this helps mate :)

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Khaiy    2148
I think that you'll be better of focusing on learning one language at a time, especially if you're new to programming. For basic programming concepts your current approach might not be so bad, but it'll keep your skills shallower in both languages than they otherwise might be.

C++ and Java have different strengths and styles. You can get similar results for a code sample in each language, but as you progress to more complicated material you're more likely to code up what you want badly in both languages. You shouldn't try to write Java code in C++, nor C++ in Java, because you'll be ignoring the different capabilities that each brings to the table.

When you have a deeper understanding of either language, you'll be able to program good code in it, which you can then look at porting it if you want. You'll also start getting a feel for when to use which language, and for what.

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Adderly    103
That absolutely does help. It seems Java is much easier to pick up even though the syntax for C++ looks cleaner to me. As I said though, I'm still working with console applications and haven't moved on to working with libraries just yet. So I'm pretty sure I'll stick with Java for now and pick back up on C++ when I feel comfortable with it. For the most part, I understand the language itself, but one thing I can't seem to grasp is memory management. Is that something I should get an early start with or should I just continue with the learning process and hope it will come second nature?

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Khaiy    2148
[quote name='Adderly' timestamp='1305829398' post='4813114']
That absolutely does help. It seems Java is much easier to pick up even though the syntax for C++ looks cleaner to me. As I said though, I'm still working with console applications and haven't moved on to working with libraries just yet. So I'm pretty sure I'll stick with Java for now and pick back up on C++ when I feel comfortable with it. For the most part, I understand the language itself, but one thing I can't seem to grasp is memory management. Is that something I should get an early start with or should I just continue with the learning process and hope it will come second nature?
[/quote]

Glad I could be of help.

As far as memory management is concerned, it's a useful aspect of programming but not necessarily one that you'll need right away, especially if you're still learning the language and working in the console. Aside from general stuff like syntax and grammar, learning a programming language is largely something where you'll learn about stuff when you need to use it.

If memory management isn't coming up for you now in a very substantial way (and it shouldn't be, from the sound of things), then you would probably do well to focus on the stuff that you [i]are[/i] using and become more skilled with it. There's plenty of time to fiddle with memory management when you need it, no reason to do so if you don't since you have other stuff that you can learn.

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XDaWNeDX    113
Focus your learning on one language. Otherwise, you'll be losing momentum in your learning every time you switch books.

Mastering one programming language, and then another, is far faster than mastering them both at the same time.

Although mastering one language on it's own will be quite hard.

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