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twintwix

Computer Science pre-school requirements

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twintwix    102
Hey, all. I'm a pre-university student here in the netherlands. Am 19 years and am struggling with courses that I don't see the point in.

I'm good in math and physics, those are my two favorite subjects. Next to that I can also get a degree in biology (my talent) and chemistry if necesarry. English degree I can also get. But to get a VWO(pre-university education) diploma here in the netherlands I need to study lame courses like french, duch language, politics, economy, etc. Why should I study those if I've never even studied IT. I should study IT instead and stick with the courses I'm good at. I've been wasting years struggling to find motivation to learn stuff I hate and make no progress on.

So, my question to you is this: Can I get into a Computer Science bachelor program on university with Pre-university English, Math (Wiskunde B the highest math degree), Physics, biology? Or just math would be even better. I do know I can get into a computer science education without any IT background. I've studied some Computer Science material, very little, but it was doable for me, even now without having finished all of my math studies yet. If I can just specialize right now I'd enjoy my education 10 times more.

The way it is now, I wake up, try to learn french, make 0.0000001% progress after a hard day of work, do 5 minutes math and learn tons of new material. It really sucks, I want to quit studying and run naked into the woods to find fellow wood people and make love with them. Thats how boring it is to study for a pre-university diploma here in holland. I am not allowed to specialize.... What do I need French for in Computer Science!!

Please give me hope with your wisdom. I have no idea what to do here. If all else fails I'll study computer science in a library with all the material for free and give the finger to the system.

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VildNinja    789
I think the rules are very country specific on that matter.. So you're probably better off asking some study adviser in your own country.


My personal experience is that I have never met anyone who liked every course they were taking. So just try to make the best out of it, you might even learn some thing usable, you didn't expect to learn. Besides computer science isn't just about math, it's also about communicating whatever you've learned and finding ways to describe non-mathematical questions with math. So the more you know about politics and economics, the more you'll be capable of analyzing the "real" world, and translate it into some thing you can parse with a computer.

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Telastyn    3777
Part of getting a degree is exhibiting proof that you can stick through all the crap that you don't like. Do you think that actual workplaces will be 100% interesting and easy to build motivation for?

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Tom Sloper    16040
[quote name='Telastyn' timestamp='1306672366' post='4817068']
Part of getting a degree is exhibiting proof that you can stick through all the crap that you don't like. Do you think that actual workplaces will be 100% interesting and easy to build motivation for?
[/quote]
Well said. I don't admire questions about the necessity of disliked required courses.
Moving this thread to Breaking In.

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twintwix    102
[quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1306675576' post='4817086']
[quote name='Telastyn' timestamp='1306672366' post='4817068']
Part of getting a degree is exhibiting proof that you can stick through all the crap that you don't like. Do you think that actual workplaces will be 100% interesting and easy to build motivation for?
[/quote]
Well said. I don't admire questions about the necessity of disliked required courses.
Moving this thread to Breaking In.
[/quote]

Sorry about that.

and thanks guys! I think my issue was one of cognitive dissonance between study and fun. A lack of clear boundaries and identity in this area of my life caused me to feel like I want to succeed in my studies and letting go of having fun yet having fun and thus letting go of my studies. Turns out I can attempt both by having a rule of thumb for time spent on studies and enjoying my personal life.

Me attempting to do all the courses and failing was an idea I was not willing to accept, which I do now thanks to these new insights. I cannot do more then my best in my attempt to "break in" computer science. Letting go of courses that didn't make sense was my futile attempt at doing more then my "best" to succeed.

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