• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Butabee

Time based progression

9 posts in this topic

How do you feel about time based progression.

For instance, you don't level by beating monsters over the head, but instead just by spending time playing the game.

So you really could spend your play time doing anything and your character would still be progressing.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So I could load the game, go make a ham sandwich, catch some Family Guy reruns, walk the dog, and take a nap, and I would come back to a L99 uber character?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Technically something like that, but it kinda defeats the purpose of a video game doesn't it?
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you mean you progress when doing something meaningful? Such as crafting an item, exploring a new area, or just fighting a monster but you don't progress from being idle?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='adam4813' timestamp='1306724761' post='4817340']
Do you mean you progress when doing something meaningful? Such as crafting an item, exploring a new area, or just fighting a monster but you don't progress from being idle?
[/quote]


Not really, I'm talking about just having the game running, and you're in the game not the menu screen or anything. So you could just let your character sit there and progress while you pick your nose or something but I don't see why someone would want to buy or play a game to do that.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Butabee' timestamp='1306703447' post='4817240']
How do you feel about time based progression.

For instance, you don't level by beating monsters over the head, but instead just by spending time playing the game.

So you really could spend your play time doing anything and your character would still be progressing.
[/quote]


There's already a game for that:
[url="http://progressquest.com/"]http://progressquest.com/[/url]
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It could be a way to make it so that someone who players 2x as much as someone else wont grow 2x faster, but it wont work if you just got to wait. There could be something wich might need a day to get done, and meanwhile you can do smaller things, so both the 1 hour/day player and 24/7 player get growth from the 1 day taking task but the 24/7 player also gets some extra from doing the small tasks.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Many years ago, a roommate and I played Gauntlet: Legends on the N64. It was a fun game, we really had a blast with it for a time. But then we discovered something. There was a particular level that had a staircase and a monster spawner at the bottom somewhere. Usually, spawners would become non-functional after a certain amount of time, but this one was bugged and would spawn indefinitely. Even though we had fun playing the game, there was something twisted about the both of us that compelled us to use rubber bands to fasten down the buttons of our controllers to make our dudes stand and fire indefinitely while we went to work.We returned to find uber-level characters. After that, the game simply was not even remotely challenging anymore, and soon we just walked away from it.

That's right. Even though we loved the game, we were still compelled to exploit it, and in consequence it became no longer fun. Now, possibly, most players won't be like this. (That is something I doubt, though, given the sheer prevalence of bug-exploitation that goes on) But I think that many will take the path of least resistance, and in a game such as you are describing, the path of least resistance is a path with absolutely no resistance at all. If the game offers even the slightest bit of challenge, many players will back off, make that ham sandwich, and just simply wait until the game becomes less challenging.

That, to me, runs counter to everything I believe a game should be. I honestly do wish that I hadn't found the exploit that spoiled Gauntlet for me, as the remainder of the game could have been enjoyable. Nevertheless, I think that if I had it to do all over again, I would [i]still [/i]try to take advantage of that exploit. Guess it's just in my nature, even though the inevitable result is an overall lessening of my enjoyment of the game.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The game EvE has a passive progression system and I don't think it effects players too much.

I think it's fine if players want to progress just by not even playing they can, but they'll miss out on a lot of the game's content which defeats the whole purpose of even owning the game.


But I also think it defeats the reason that a lot, maybe most people play games, and that's to have some sense of achievement.

It takes no skill or ability to have progress handed to you.


Granted there could still be some other sense of achievement such as defeating a difficult boss or something, but it seems people today are all about the bosses shinies.


I've asked around and pretty much no one seems to like this method of progressing.... makes me wonder how EvE got away with it.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I played Eve for a few years, and all they have done is move the grind from being level-based to money based. So although in theory you could level indefinitely, you will end up with an uber character that you can't do anything with.

I think that the overall premise you started with, the one where "...really could spend your play time doing anything and your character would still be progressing."could prove to be a valid system, as long as you are actively playing. This would allow people who PvP to gain the same amount of experience as those who PvE or focus on Industry. Implemented incorrectly, however, would lead to the rubber-band method, which is something I think we all try at some point (for me it was with [i]Ys Book I & II[/i]).
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0