Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Gibbers

VS2010 licensing, among other things.

This topic is 2607 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

My friends and I have been working on a game (XNA) which we plan to possibly sell. We're using Visual Studio 2010 through DreamSpark, and a student version of 3ds Max. The license agreements for both of these state that it's for student/personal use only.

Does anyone have any experience with this who can explain the licensing?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
You can switch to the Express version of Visual C#, which is free and can be used to create commercial products. With 3ds Max you might be out of luck though..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can switch to the Express version of Visual C#, which is free and can be used to create commercial products. With 3ds Max you might be out of luck though..

What limitations does the express version have? Anything that would have any effect on us?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The express versions are quite good actually. They lack plugin support and possibly also integrated source code control (not sure about that one). You could also look at BizSpark which is targeted at startups.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[quote name='Erik Rufelt' timestamp='1306877765' post='4818041']
You can switch to the Express version of Visual C#, which is free and can be used to create commercial products. With 3ds Max you might be out of luck though..

What limitations does the express version have? Anything that would have any effect on us?
[/quote]

For C# there are a few limitations, most notably the lack of customizable breakpoints and less powerful refactoring tools. (You can still set/remove breakpoints, you just can't configure them to only trigger if a certain condition is met), The limitations won't affect the end result but for large projects and teams the more expensive editions might provide a decent productivity boost)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[quote name='Gibbers' timestamp='1306878502' post='4818048']
[quote name='Erik Rufelt' timestamp='1306877765' post='4818041']
You can switch to the Express version of Visual C#, which is free and can be used to create commercial products. With 3ds Max you might be out of luck though..

What limitations does the express version have? Anything that would have any effect on us?
[/quote]

For C# there are a few limitations, most notably the lack of customizable breakpoints and less powerful refactoring tools. (You can still set/remove breakpoints, you just can't configure them to only trigger if a certain condition is met), The limitations won't affect the end result but for large projects and teams the more expensive editions might provide a decent productivity boost)
[/quote]

Debugger support for muliple threads, ie viewing a list of threads, activating threads etc is missing. Although the debugger can debug multi threaded apps if you set breakpoints which you know a particular thread will hit.
Also the express editions do not have support for 64bit or ATL/MFC, probably not an issue if you are only using XNA.


David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi dblack,

you habe limited support for setup projects. That might be a problem when you sell your game. There are of course free alternatives.
I would recommend the express version for the developing process and buing a commercial version for the last builds, testing and creating the installer.

--GWDev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about switching to Blender instead of 3ds max?


+1 for this, although I havnt used 3ds much (and Maya a bit more) polygon and subserf modelling in Blender is as good or better than these. Rigging and animation in 2.5 is also very good, perhaps not quite as good as Maya, but more than adequate for a game.

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!