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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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RoyCHill

The professional vs The ambitious

10 posts in this topic

I just have this feeling that professionals have the certifications, degrees, maybe a union or too, or a guild to base their professionalism out of. I have nothing. NOTHING. *takes a sip of fruit juice* My professionalism was stripped from me because of the new trends of Information Technology against this new MIS/Administration degree and the Computer forensic science degrees. A was just a IT person with no professional background. I grew with the corporation that I learned from. So I think some security guard had a Computer Forensic degree and was snooping all over the IT department for evidence of computer hacking. Of course, operations through virtual machines are good security breach flags so someone tried to underhand me in the office. I just walked off the property and quit 3 years ago and I am still hurting with the rest in the nonprofessional computer industry. I should have carried bought a 12 pack of Coors(TM) and poured it all over my cloths as I left. Who knows what really happened but there is always a struggle for the learner and the qualifier and it can get violent.
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If you have experience getting certifications should be easy. Some schools would probably even give you credit for your large amount of work experience making a degree reasonable to come by.
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[quote name='ApochPiQ' timestamp='1307923892' post='4822551']
Professionalism has nothing to do with certifications, degrees, or whatever else. It's an attitude.

I'm a professional game developer, and I have no certifications, no degrees, no union membership, nothing of the kind.
[/quote]

QFT. You can have all the certificates in the world and still not be a professional. Being a professional is about having a work ethic, respecting the fact that someone is willing to trade money for your skillset and always doing your best to achieve a good outcome for [b]your employer[/b]. Not you, the guy who pays the bills.
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I am not quite sure what you are saying. Do you mean that you were up to something, got caught and left before they could fire you and now they keep providing a bad reference? Sorry if i read it wrong but that's how it comes across ? People don't just target you with false accusations for no reason in my experience...
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[quote name='ChaosEngine' timestamp='1307950980' post='4822642']
[quote name='ApochPiQ' timestamp='1307923892' post='4822551']
Professionalism has nothing to do with certifications, degrees, or whatever else. It's an attitude.

I'm a professional game developer, and I have no certifications, no degrees, no union membership, nothing of the kind.
[/quote]

QFT. You can have all the certificates in the world and still not be a professional. Being a professional is about having a work ethic, respecting the fact that someone is willing to trade money for your skillset and always doing your best to achieve a good outcome for [b]your employer[/b]. Not you, the guy who pays the bills.
[/quote]
This. I remember my first programming job, before I had any degree (not even high school). My boss explained to me that he viewed me as a professional, and a certain coworker as a "talented amateur." Being professional is about working hard, producing quality output, and playing nicely with others.
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[quote name='Hodgman' timestamp='1307938494' post='4822605']
What? Are you drunk?
[/quote]

I am equally confused.
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[quote name='Hodgman' timestamp='1307938494' post='4822605']
What? Are you drunk?
[/quote]
This was my thought as well.
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