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Should I choose hardware engineer or software engineer or programmer as my career?

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Should I choose hardware engineer or software engineer or programmer as my career?


Yes

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Guess that depends, do you want to actually work for a living?

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Why not join the army and go into sharpshooting instead?

Your family would never see it coming.

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You know, you guys could at least try to post on topic. Please remember that one of the Lounge rules is not to post just to post - and that includes replies as well as starting threads.

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On topic: I'd go hardware engineer just because it's a little less generic and I always wished I had a more fundamental and physical knowledge of what was going on inside all my hardware. You kind of get the idea through logic gates and stuff, but that's still relatively abstract.

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I'd also go with hardware; comp sci folks are a dime a dozen, it lets you do things a comp sci person can't and you can probably do fine if games if you want to go that way if you can program and have a portfolio.

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I'd also go with hardware; comp sci folks are a dime a dozen, it lets you do things a comp sci person can't and you can probably do fine if games if you want to go that way if you can program and have a portfolio.



They are a dime a dozen because there are dozens ( ok, millions ) of jobs. Going to have a bitch of a time finding employement in electrical engineering field these days.

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They are a dime a dozen because there are dozens ( ok, millions ) of jobs. Going to have a bitch of a time finding employement in electrical engineering field these days.


Why do you say that? It might not necessarily be games related, but there are plenty of places that need electrical engineers. Plus when the apocalypse comes they can still make computers while us programmers will have no idea what to do.

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[quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1310067489' post='4832456']
They are a dime a dozen because there are dozens ( ok, millions ) of jobs. Going to have a bitch of a time finding employement in electrical engineering field these days.


Why do you say that? It might not necessarily be games related, but there are plenty of places that need electrical engineers. Plus when the apocalypse comes they can still make computers while us programmers will have no idea what to do.
[/quote]

My EE buddy has been unemployed since last year. Your mileage may vary.

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My EE buddy has been unemployed since last year. Your mileage may vary.


And I'm having a heck of a time finding good senior developers (that can speak English) in my area. All anecdotal of course, but the recruiters I'm using are all telling the same story. Plenty of companies looking, not a lot of talent available.

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I'll throw one on too. I knew a guy who didn't really know programming or anything who went in to get a CS degree. Now he's - I think - an AI researcher or something and does really fascinating stuff. It sounds like a joy.

I'll retract that comment about them being a "dime a dozen"; there's a lot of mediocre people in some fields, especially if they seem like the obvious thing to go into (CS is for a lot of people) and that inflates the figures and by no means that talent is common. If you're smart and serious, somebody needs you.

I can't say anything else except that the OP ought to think about what he has a passion for so that he'll take it seriously.

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On topic: I'd go hardware engineer just because it's a little less generic and I always wished I had a more fundamental and physical knowledge of what was going on inside all my hardware. You kind of get the idea through logic gates and stuff, but that's still relatively abstract.


What do you mean by generic?

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I'd also go with hardware; comp sci folks are a dime a dozen, it lets you do things a comp sci person can't and you can probably do fine if games if you want to go that way if you can program and have a portfolio.


Hardware is it easier to find job next time?

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[quote name='JoeCooper' timestamp='1310066702' post='4832443']
I'd also go with hardware; comp sci folks are a dime a dozen, it lets you do things a comp sci person can't and you can probably do fine if games if you want to go that way if you can program and have a portfolio.



They are a dime a dozen because there are dozens ( ok, millions ) of jobs. Going to have a bitch of a time finding employement in electrical engineering field these days.
[/quote]

sorry.. I dont learn E and E..

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[quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1310067489' post='4832456']
They are a dime a dozen because there are dozens ( ok, millions ) of jobs. Going to have a bitch of a time finding employement in electrical engineering field these days.


Why do you say that? It might not necessarily be games related, but there are plenty of places that need electrical engineers. Plus when the apocalypse comes they can still make computers while us programmers will have no idea what to do.
[/quote]

I never learn electrical engineers..

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I'll throw one on too. I knew a guy who didn't really know programming or anything who went in to get a CS degree. Now he's - I think - an AI researcher or something and does really fascinating stuff. It sounds like a joy.

I'll retract that comment about them being a "dime a dozen"; there's a lot of mediocre people in some fields, especially if they seem like the obvious thing to go into (CS is for a lot of people) and that inflates the figures and by no means that talent is common. If you're smart and serious, somebody needs you.

I can't say anything else except that the OP ought to think about what he has a passion for so that he'll take it seriously.


sorry but may I know what is CS?

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I think I prefer software engineer..


I'm suspicious that you have a clear mental image of what "software engineering" (as opposed to computer science).

But if you want to do computers and software, by all means have a closer look at those and see if either resonates with you and, chances are, you can switch from one to the other without too much extra work if you change your mind.

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Should I choose hardware engineer or software engineer or programmer as my career?


You seem to love rockets, why don't you become an astronaut?

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