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CaseyHardman

Creating a demo for a 3D FPS?

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I was wondering the scale of creating a simple demo for a 3D first-person-shooter. This isn't necessarily graphics, but more like the movement (WASD), jumping, wall jumping, and other physics-related things, and simple firing of a weapon. First person camera movement with the mouse would also be necessary.

I've dabbled with game programming, but only with 2D games. I've used Game Maker Language (GML) and ActionScript3 and plan on learning C++ or C#, unless there's another language that would be more ideal for what I described above.
I'm also not entirely sure what existing game engines can do...would an engine be an easy way out of a lot of work, since I'm not planning on releasing the demo or selling it?

I have a GDD that's somewhere near finished for the game I have in mind, but I want to test some of the values. I was planning on making this 'demo' so I could see the physics in action and possibly change the design if I find certain problems.

So, I basically need to be directed towards the right direction for something like this. Any other tips and pieces of advice are welcome, too.

Thanks!

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If you just want to use an existing renderer and make your demo while looking nice and learning a "minimum" of programming:
Go with unity or UDK.

If you intend to program the demo yourself:If you're new to full-fledged OOP languages such as C# and C++, I recommend you go with C# granted you're developing for windows.
If you prefer a more portable framework, and as it seems, focusing on prototyping something, I would go with python and OpenGL.
You might want to look into a little C++ then.

You'll be able to compose a fair demo quick and dirty, but it will probably only contain the absolute minimum requirements for your demo before it will sand over.
A finished project will take a larger team or more experienced, but I bet you read that many times in here.

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[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1310456859' post='4834171']
If you just want to use an existing renderer and make your demo while looking nice and learning a "minimum" of programming:
Go with unity or UDK.

If you intend to program the demo yourself:If you're new to full-fledged OOP languages such as C# and C++, I recommend you go with C# granted you're developing for windows.
If you prefer a more portable framework, and as it seems, focusing on prototyping something, I would go with python and OpenGL.
You might want to look into a little C++ then.

You'll be able to compose a fair demo quick and dirty, but it will probably only contain the absolute minimum requirements for your demo before it will sand over.
A finished project will take a larger team or more experienced, but I bet you read that many times in here.
[/quote]

I wouldn't use Python if you would like to learn C++ after, I would use Java instead as like C# it has a similar syntax to C++.
A prototype IMHO should only contain the elements that you want to test, so graphics isn't important if it is a gameplay prototype.

You are probably best of to do this with an already existing engine other wise you will get frustrated with the prototype, UDK or Unity are good. UDK offers a Java like language or Kismet editor for simple extensions to it. Unity supports C# as a language as far as I know.

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[quote name='NightCreature83' timestamp='1310464211' post='4834208']
[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1310456859' post='4834171']
If you just want to use an existing renderer and make your demo while looking nice and learning a "minimum" of programming:
Go with unity or UDK.

If you intend to program the demo yourself:If you're new to full-fledged OOP languages such as C# and C++, I recommend you go with C# granted you're developing for windows.
If you prefer a more portable framework, and as it seems, focusing on prototyping something, I would go with python and OpenGL.
You might want to look into a little C++ then.

You'll be able to compose a fair demo quick and dirty, but it will probably only contain the absolute minimum requirements for your demo before it will sand over.
A finished project will take a larger team or more experienced, but I bet you read that many times in here.
[/quote]

I wouldn't use Python if you would like to learn C++ after, I would use Java instead as like C# it has a similar syntax to C++.
A prototype IMHO should only contain the elements that you want to test, so graphics isn't important if it is a gameplay prototype.

You are probably best of to do this with an already existing engine other wise you will get frustrated with the prototype, UDK or Unity are good. UDK offers a Java like language or Kismet editor for simple extensions to it. Unity supports C# as a language as far as I know.
[/quote]
Well, If we're talking little programming skills, Python can be a good place to start for prototyping, and later on C++ is a great way to attend algorithms in detail.
Obviously It would, as you say, be better to chose similar looking languages for starters. And Java [u]is[/u] easy to learn...


I'm not saying he should take on any language if he only wants to produce a demo without learning much programming, though.
I think we can both agree that the mentioned engines+frameworks are a good choice then. Abstraction is probably what GHMP is after for creating that demo,
given his experience with [color=#1C2837][size=2]GML and ActionScript3...[/size][/color]

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I wouldn't want to do it the halfhearted way. I'd prefer learning a language to do it rather than having the program do it for me (for example, that's why I learned Game Maker Language rather than using it's drag-and-drop features). It would be good if I could learn a language that is the most ideal choice for creating a 3D MOFPS, that way I will get more experience if I ever try to get a team for my project (not the demo, the full game).

I have UDK, but I'm not sure what Unity is. To me, it seems like UDK has a whole lot of things you have to learn to use it. I'm fine with that, but I might choose something else over it if those things you'd have to learn aren't going to help you at all if you aren't using UDK. Besides, would a project that you're planning on making into a 'real game' (with a disc and a case, sold in stores, with publishers involved) use UDK? I thought I heard UDK wouldn't be a good choice for something like that.

For the demo, however, I'm willing to do whatever, but I'd prefer the one that gives the most valuable experience, even if it's a bit harder...so long as it doesn't take years to finish.

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[quote name='GHMP' timestamp='1310516614' post='4834569']
Besides, would a project that you're planning on making into a 'real game' (with a disc and a case, sold in stores, with publishers involved) use UDK? I thought I heard UDK wouldn't be a good choice for something like that.
[/quote]

Not sure where you heard that, there are [url="http://www.unrealengine.com/showcase"]'real games'[/url] that are made with UDK.

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UDK is a great choice for people who already have modding experience, but may have a steeper learning curve for those who are starting from scratch. It is in either case a very powerful engine, as you would be using the very same technology used by many AAA studios. Whilst some details may vary, any experience you get working with the UDK will translate to making games via other methods.

Unity is a bit more approachable for someone with no experience; it has a large community offering support, good documentation, and provides a friendly interface for carrying out a lot of the functionality, with the ability to script using a number of languages. It is also a great technology that is more than capable of professional quality work, and once again any skills learned will transfer to working with other approaches.


I would recommend that you develop with Unity, coding in C# [i]or[/i] that you pick up the UDK and create your demo using it. In your case I would advise against starting "from scratch" or working with a lower-level solution.

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[s]Is Unity free? I thought I was installing it, but now it says I have to register and get a 30-day free trial...maybe there's a free version?[/s]
[s]
[/s]
Nevermind, I'm an idiot...
I have it now, heh...just have to go through all of the online documentation and ... well, make the demo I guess.

Thanks for all of the help and advice! Edited by GHMP

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