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yats55

Whats the difference between a Computer and a Video Game Console

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I'm not at all saying theres no point of video game consoles. It just seems like they work kinda the same, but less powerful for their times as computers.
but I wanted to know the main difference of the way it works and stuff.

I'm also curious, If more memory is really big in consoles, how come they don't put more in? As Computers even at those times had way more memory.

So just whats the difference in hardware of consoles and the difference of how they worked? Such as, Do they use different Hardware chips and stuff ment?

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[quote name='bigbadbear9885' timestamp='1310795359' post='4835903']
I'm not at all saying theres no point of video game consoles. It just seems like they work kinda the same, but less powerful for their times as computers.
but I wanted to know the main difference of the way it works and stuff.

I'm also curious, If more memory is really big in consoles, how come they don't put more in? As Computers even at those times had way more memory.

So just whats the difference in hardware of consoles and the difference of how they worked? Such as, Do they use different Hardware chips and stuff ment?
[/quote]

A general PC is a collection of unknown hardware with unknown software running on it. You may have someone with a dual-core 1.5GHz celeron with a slow motherboard, no memory, and millions of spyware apps running. Ir they may have a 16-core gaming rig with every OS service turned off, running amazingly smooth. Consequently a PC game will need to be written to run well on a minimum-spec while also taking advantage of a higher end machine.

A game console is the opposite.

A game console gives you a very specific set of hardware, running a very specific set of programs. You know exactly what you are getting. You can write to that specific system, knowing that you will always have exactly that much memory, and that you will have exactly that graphics performance, and always have exactly that well-known system. Knowing the exact specs, even if they are less than the PC's high end specs, is a very powerful knowledge. You can design exactly for that system, and you know it will work.

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They're mass produced computers, packaged up into attractive boxes, and pre-loaded with a special OS.

You can find their hardware components on wikipedia:
[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xbox_360_hardware"]http://en.wikipedia....ox_360_hardware[/url]
[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PlayStation_3_hardware"]http://en.wikipedia....tion_3_hardware[/url]
[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wii#Technical_specifications"]http://en.wikipedia...._specifications[/url]

When the 360/PS3 were released, they were (arguably) more powerful than your average PC at the time. They're 6 years old now and are starting to show their age, however, their CPUs in particular will still give your average PC a run for it's money.

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One reason to remember(at least more so with older consoles say N64 and before) was that there was little to no overhead from an OS, rather, the games ARE the OS, if such a thing had to be said. Compared to PC, you could squeeze a fair share of performance out of the machines because your game was all that was running. If you remember the days of shutting down Windows 95 to play games in DOS, you will know exactly what I'm talking about. Windows 95 took up so much overhead(at least at first, and remember the hardware back then) that it was shunned by developers for a good while. Now, the windows OS still takes its overhead, but the hardware has gotten far enough ahead(what with dedicated 3d video cards, instead of using the processor) that the OS overhead is no longer a concern. That is kind of how consoles have gotten too, as far as hardware being ahead of the time.

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