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AlexGobeli

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Hello, i have never used this forum or website before, and i haven't found any topics about this, but i need help on how to enter the door way of game development. I am 18 if it helps.

What is the best way to get into the game development field? I know BASIC (i read 90% of a book on basic C++) C++ programming. I like more of the artistic side tho. I have UDK, Autodesk Mudbox, Autodesk Maya, and Autodesk 3ds max. I also have Google Sketchup (and am pretty good at it...if i may say so myself). I have only made 2 sculptures in Mudbox, both are busts (just trying to learn how to use it right now). I could attach those if needed.

Would it be best for me to try to create a small game myself? or try to assemble a dev. team to make one? I just have no clue.

If any other information is needed to help answer my question, please ask!

thanks!!

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For you I would recommend choosing a tool and sticking with it. UDK is a good way to go. If you don't have an interest in programmingUDK will suit you well as it is really a tool to empower artists. Choose a discipline and take it as far as you can.

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[quote name='unyielding' timestamp='1310850775' post='4836144']
For you I would recommend choosing a tool and sticking with it. UDK is a good way to go. If you don't have an interest in programmingUDK will suit you well as it is really a tool to empower artists. Choose a discipline and take it as far as you can.
[/quote]


With UDK I need to create meshes to add into my world, thats why I have Mudbox. But as far as actualy creating a game, what would the best path on doing this?

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[quote name='rexathon' timestamp='1310851065' post='4836146']
[quote name='unyielding' timestamp='1310850775' post='4836144']
For you I would recommend choosing a tool and sticking with it. UDK is a good way to go. If you don't have an interest in programmingUDK will suit you well as it is really a tool to empower artists. Choose a discipline and take it as far as you can.
[/quote]


With UDK I need to create meshes to add into my world, thats why I have Mudbox. But as far as actualy creating a game, what would the best path on doing this?
[/quote]

UDK will allow you to make games as well, it is a full game development suite. I have a good friend that runs one of the best UDK tutorial sites on the net, check it out :) http://forecourse.com/unreal-tutorials/

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[quote name='rexathon' timestamp='1310850197' post='4836138']1. i haven't found any topics about this
2. i need help on how to enter the door way of game development. I am 18 if it helps.
What is the best way to get into the game development field? [/quote]
1. You must not have looked very hard, then.
2. Do you mean as a job, or as an amateur game programmer on the side while you earn money in some other field? If the latter, or if you want to start to learn programming now, read this forum's FAQs (link is above). If you mean the former, go to [url="http://www.gamedev.net/forum/101-breaking-into-the-games-industry/"]the Breaking In forum[/url] and read that forum's FAQs.

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Thank you for the link.

Not really as a job, but some way to get my feet wet so I can learn, as well as gain experience so i can get a job later.

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[quote name='rexathon' timestamp='1310875018' post='4836246']
1. Thank you for the link.
2. Not really as a job,
3. but ... so i can get a job later.
[/quote]
1. You're welcome.
2. Then you don't need to get a Computer Science degree,
3. but you should get a Computer Science degree.

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I would say if you really want to get start just choice the thing that interest you the most and learn it. if it is graphics then make it your goal to create a amazing looking model for example. by time you reach that level in 3d modeling you should feel confident in make all types of 3d models hopefully. Not only that but as you work you way to your goal you will build up a portfolio of all you amazing work as you go along. Of course you goal can be far more ambitious then mine but remember that if them is what you want them you must have determination do accomplish it. If you have determination and ambition then you will soon see all the things you want come to you, Why? because you made them come to you.

2) start making connects with people that also have this interest just like you, not only can you learn some nifty secrets from them but connections go a long way in business



[i][font="Calibri"][size="3"]*** edited out my awesomeness poetic momment :P***[/size][/font][/i]

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I think you should first decide where your passion lies..Is it the programming or the art development aspect..

If it is the programming aspect,then you first need to ask yourself am I really prepared to do some hard work and spend time..If you are prepared to go for programming then get ur C++ skills up to date..since u have already covered 90% of the stuff that shouldn't be hard to do...Then u need to choose an API..if u want to go for DirectX then I would suggest u go for Introduction to 3D Game Programming with DirectX 10 By Frank D. Luna..it is a very good beginner book talking about most of the general stuff u need to know in a very understandable manner..

As for openGL I would suggest the OpenGL Super Bible..

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If you like making 3D models then try downloading Blender or a similar tool. (I used to like anim8or) to build up your portfolio.
If you want to be a level designer, find games that let you design levels (I know Tomb Raider Revelations for PC had this as a bonus CD) and do that.

Whatever you do you should build up a portfolio of examples and practice practice practice. Then try applying to game companies.

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If you're more interested on the art side of things then you're on the wrong forum Gamedev.net is mostly about the programming side of game creation.

Head over to [url="http://www.polycount.com/forum/"]Polycount[/url] and/or [url="http://www.gameartisans.org/forums/index.php"]GameArtisans[/url] with Polycount being my preference.

Some steps to take to land a job as a game artist:

1. Develop your "traditional" art skills, drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, etc... these skills will pay off huge dividends when applied to CG artwork. At 18 years old if you can afford it and want to then you should definitely go to college and get a degree in fine arts or illustration.

2. Develop your CG art skills on the side, [b]do not go to a school for this[/b]. Everything you need to know can be learned online from free and cheap resources like [url="http://www.digitaltutors.com/11/index.php"]Digital Tutors[/url] and [url="http://www.eat3d.com/"]Eat 3D[/url].

For 3D you'll at least need modeling, UV layout, and texturing skills. If you want to work at a AAA studio you'll also need to know how to create high poly models to bake normal and now even displacement textures from to apply to your low poly models. Stick with Max or Maya as they are industry standards, either one will be fine.

There's also pixel and vector based artwork for 2D games. That route would lead you to a job in mobile, or web based games companies.

There is also animation, but at least for 3D artists if you are an animator then you specialize and only work on animation.

3. Once your art skills are at a high enough level, create a portfolio along [url="http://www.polycount.com/forum/showthread.php?t=39516"]these guidelines[/url] and start applying for work.

Good luck

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[quote name='Ben Apuna' timestamp='1311571131' post='4839859']
If you're more interested on the art side of things then you're on the wrong forum Gamedev.net is mostly about the programming side of game creation.

Head over to [url="http://www.polycount.com/forum/"]Polycount[/url] and/or [url="http://www.gameartisans.org/forums/index.php"]GameArtisans[/url] with Polycount being my preference.

Some steps to take to land a job as a game artist:

1. Develop your "traditional" art skills, drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, etc... these skills will pay off huge dividends when applied to CG artwork. At 18 years old if you can afford it and want to then you should definitely go to college and get a degree in fine arts or illustration.

2. Develop your CG art skills on the side, [b]do not go to a school for this[/b]. Everything you need to know can be learned online from free and cheap resources like [url="http://www.digitaltutors.com/11/index.php"]Digital Tutors[/url] and [url="http://www.eat3d.com/"]Eat 3D[/url].

For 3D you'll at least need modeling, UV layout, and texturing skills. If you want to work at a AAA studio you'll also need to know how to create high poly models to bake normal and now even displacement textures from to apply to your low poly models. Stick with Max or Maya as they are industry standards, either one will be fine.

There's also pixel and vector based artwork for 2D games. That route would lead you to a job in mobile, or web based games companies.

There is also animation, but at least for 3D artists if you are an animator then you specialize and only work on animation.

3. Once your art skills are at a high enough level, create a portfolio along [url="http://www.polycount.com/forum/showthread.php?t=39516"]these guidelines[/url] and start applying for work.

Good luck
[/quote]

Thanks for the links, I'll check them out shortly. I'm still in highschool (Will be a senior, school starts around sept. 4). Do you know of any good schools to go to for college? I was thinking about going to Tribeca Flashpoint Acadamy in Chicago. (Btw sorry for the wrong website..)

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I can't really recommend any good art schools lacking any first hand knowledge myself. State run schools will generally have good art programs.

If you can then you should go and visit the schools you are considering to talk to the students there, to ask them what their experience has been like, and see the quality of their graduate's portfolios. Also find information on the professors/instructors that you will be learning from to see the quality and kind of artwork they have made.

Whatever you do, [b]avoid for profit schools like the Art Institute at all costs.[/b] Unless you are an exceptional student a diploma from a for profit "game" school won't get you a job anywhere other than Gamestop. I'm sorry to say but looking at that Tribeca Flashpoint it looks more like a for profit school, and honestly I wasn't impressed with their student demo reel. With a two year program like that there is not much time to learn what you really need to in order to be employable. There really isn't a quick easy way to get a good education. An observation would be that the more money and effort a school puts into fancy websites and marketing materials the worse they probably are as a school.

I suggest something more along the lines of this [url="http://www.uic.edu/ucat/catalog/AAARTDESIGN.shtml#w"]BFA in Studio Arts - Painting and Sculpture [/url]at the University of Illinois at Chicago to really learn the fundamentals of art. All the flashy CG stuff that Tribeca Flashpoint is emphasizing can be learned on your own time at home from places like Polycount and the other sites I mentioned.

Game art is a very competitive field. Without a strong background in traditional art you'll at best be a mediocre CG artist (like myself unfortunately) and have a really difficult time finding and keeping stable employment especially in times when the economy is bad like now.

Another bit of advice against going to a for profit "game" school is that you are young and your interests might change. My interests have bounced from programming to art then back to programming in the 30+ years I've been alive. I think you should expose yourself to as broad an education as possible at first so that you can sample things to see what possibilities exist in life and if anything else might be more fun and worthwhile to learn.

I hope that helps.

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