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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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DavidGonzalezArce

HTML5, JS and CSS3. Unity question.

8 posts in this topic

I have a book on HTML but its based on XHTML. Will that hinder me in some way? I want to learn HTML5, is it better to start with HTML5 and the new standards?

Any good IDE's, books or resources, paid or free, that you would personally reccomend a begginner for learning HTML5, Javascript and CSS3?


And a bit off topic, When you buy Unity, does it have life time updates support in the ''contract''? Like, buy it and never have to buy it again if they decide to update it, etc. Didnt read anything like that on the website.
Some engines, have it. Just wondering if Unity does.
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HTML5 adds some new tags, that is all. Now XHTML just means that you are writing code that tries to not suck too much, it isn't an actual technology or anything.
HTML4 code will almost always work when parsing a page as 5, since hardly anything got removed (a few useless tags nobody uses).

I don't know why anyone would need a book for HTML, CSS, or JS, as they are very simple by design.
Googling skills are more then enough, especially when most problems come from the crappy browser implementation, which you will easily find answers to on the web.
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I find the [url="http://www.w3schools.com/"]http://www.w3schools.com/[/url] web site very useful as a reference for all things HTML/CSS/JS.

You may also want to look into jQuery which will solve most cross-browser problems.
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"I don't know why anyone would need a book for HTML, CSS, or JS, as they are very simple by design."

Im better with a book on hand, and also they usually provide questions and examples. I dont always have an internet connection, too.
---

Thanks for the information.

What about IDE's?

Found one called Aptana Studio 3, by the looks of it, it seems good. But I wouldnt know, being a beginner and all.
---

Any more advice would be greatly appreciated! Hopefully I can start very soon.
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I don't use an IDE for web dev. I just use Notepad++ and the multitude of browsers I have to test with.

Dreamweaver is pretty good and does auto completion for HTML, CSS and JavaScript, which is good for learning what options are available on each element, attribute, etc.
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[size="2"]I also tend to work with code but do it using Coffee Cup HTML Editor ( [url="http://www.coffeecup.com"]www.coffeecup.com[/url]) which has numerous shortcuts which makes working in the code view much faster than working with Notepad. This is a very highly rated but low cost editor with many more functions than the code view and once bought gives you free upgrades for life. I've been using it for about 12 years. It is frequently compared in reviews with Dreamweaver which costs many times more. To learn HTML and CSS, don't go past the web. I'd use Coffee Cup in combination with [url="http://www.w3schools.com"]www.w3schools.com[/url]
and/or [url="http://www.w3.org/wiki/HTML/Training"]www.w3.org/wiki/HTML/Training[/url] as well as other [url="http://www.w3.org"]www.w3.org[/url] facilities such as Unicorn (their Validator) ,their Cheat Sheets and a lot of study, and you should be able to master HTML easily enough. HTML5 is still in draft form and you should read the latest press release at [url="http://www.w3.org/2011/05/html5lc-pr.html.en"]http://www.w3.org/2011/05/html5lc-pr.html.en[/url]
In my opinion, you're best not to start by studying your XMTL book. Start from scratch with a current training programme which will take into account the concepts behind the levels that HTML5 has already reached. Same thing with CSS.

[/size]
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PS. Coffee Cup has a very good web authoring book in PDF form although I haven't read the latest version so I'm not sure how up to date it is.
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[quote name='wolfscaptain' timestamp='1311350045' post='4838975']
HTML5 adds some new tags, that is all.[/quote]

Although being entirely accurate, I do not feel that it gives an accurate impression. I experimented with HTML5 by recreating a few pages that I had done in HTML 4.01 and was able to eliminate over half of the images used on the page without any real noticeable visual change. In my opinion, that is a huge benefit. Of course, these alterations are not compatible with IE in any way. The advantage of HTML5, at this time, is mostly dependent on what exactly you are trying to do.

In answer to the actual question at hand, I believe that it is advantageous to learn the new standard since it abbreviates some development while also including basically all of the old standard.
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[quote name='M.Jackson' timestamp='1311475339' post='4839445']
[quote name='wolfscaptain' timestamp='1311350045' post='4838975']
HTML5 adds some new tags, that is all.[/quote]

Although being entirely accurate, I do not feel that it gives an accurate impression. I experimented with HTML5 by recreating a few pages that I had done in HTML 4.01 and was able to eliminate over half of the images used on the page without any real noticeable visual change. In my opinion, that is a huge benefit. Of course, these alterations are not compatible with IE in any way. The advantage of HTML5, at this time, is mostly dependent on what exactly you are trying to do.

In answer to the actual question at hand, I believe that it is advantageous to learn the new standard since it abbreviates some development while also including basically all of the old standard.
[/quote]

Oh don't get me wrong, the new specs are awesome.
What I meant is that you don't need to search specifically for information on either of 4 or 5.

Then again, I always search according to what I actually need.

As an example, I hated the hash-way to change the address so I just searched for "html change address with no refresh" and tada, html5 has it.

This is why I said that the internet is the best tool - just search diretly for anything you want.
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