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daedalus316

Online Learning Options for a 13 year old

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daedalus316    119
Well the title says it all really. I am a 13 year old and want to learn game development. I mainly want to focus on programming and modelling. I have tried to learn through free tutorials but am finding it very difficult. I also have found some options online but the are all for high-school grads. so does anyone know of any options?

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The key site I see linked too for video tutorials these days is [url="http://www.3dbuzz.com/vbforum/sv_home.php"]3D Buzz[/url] they have some amazing quality tutorial series for a number of modelling programs as well as programming tutorials using frameworks such as XNA or the Unity3D engine. I'd recommend them first and foremost a second recommendation I would give is the [url="http://www.burgzergarcade.com/"]BurgZergArcade[/url] tutorial series on creating a Hack and Slash game in Unity3D it focuses primarily on the C# language within Unity but it would be very beneficial as a starting point to teach you the basics of Object-orientated programming.

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SuperVGA    1132
Well, if you want to learn high-school grad stuff, what's keeping you from reading tutorials for high-school grads?
I suggest you learn about trigonometry, vectors and basic 2d coordinate systems first. Mostly because that's what i learned by myself back in elementary, as a part of learning game programming.

Also, see this for Java programming (I recommend that for a first language): http://eclipsetutorial.sourceforge.net/totalbeginner.html

Should be good for beginners. My main suggestion to you is to mess with stuff and learn by example.

Mess with the code and compile again. :-)

I advice against using a 3d graphics framework for a start. Do a little hello world first. Learn to program before going 3d.

That goes for development. For modelling there should be plenty of good beginner tutorials. Eventually you can combine the two fields [u]slowly[/u] with a 3d framework.

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daedalus316    119
I have seen 3D buzz before and they seem good and so does BurgZerg Arcade but what i was really looking for was somekind of courses with instructors. the only stuff I can find looks outdated or only for college students

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daedalus316    119
do you know anyspecific tutoprials or courses that could help me learn all that stuff and from experience how much would you say you actually use trig in game development

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Well courses with instructors generally come at a premium, I think that there are enough online learning resources available that you'd be able to teach yourself the necessary skills to program or model with time and patience. I think first you need to get out of the mind set that your too young or its for college students, if you're planning on learning a skill such as programming at age 13 you are going to be learning topics that are very difficult compared to things that are typically in your age range. Websites such as [url="http://www.dreamincode.net"]Dream in Code[/url] have numerous tutorials for learning programming which start from the absolute basics and then progress onto more difficult topics, this I would think is a good starting point to learning a programming language at your age or any age.

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SuperVGA    1132
I don't know of any online learning options with instructors. Maybe the full sail "university" has one? That would probably cost, though...

I've used trig in all game samples I've ever made besides pac man and tetris. If you only intend to write arcade games it's not absolutely neccessary, but it will usually come in handy. Now i use trig all the time, and even when i want to make a basic game i find good use for trig. Trust me on that.

Concepts that "basic" have lots of google hits and good articles on its use.

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daedalus316    119
Well I have already gotten rid of the mindset i'm to young (although someother poeple haven't) and as far as I know fullsail is only for high schools grads. I have tred with tutorials before but the thing is all of them are not linked and so I kinda lose direction. I was wanting a single course/instructor so it would make progress a little easier for me.

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3D Buzz will be your best bet for a single tutorial series in which you can create something and for lack of a better word monitor your progress as you go through them, particularly in the C# XNA tutorials when they create small games and run you through various aspects of programming involved.

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Well I would say C# is about the same as Java in terms of difficulty but far easier than C++ which is what you want with an initial language. I would even suggest trying out programs like [url="http://www.rpgmakerweb.com/product/rpg-maker-xp"]RPG Maker XP[/url] or [url="http://www.rpgmakerweb.com/product/rpg-maker-vx"]RPG Maker VX[/url]. These both use RGSS which is a variant of Ruby, this was the base language I learnt then progressed onto C# and now onto C++. One of the advantages of starting with those programs despite there limitations is the availability of help online from the RPG Maker communities which includes hundreds of free scripts you could learn from.

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Radikalizm    4807
[quote name='daedalus316' timestamp='1311686297' post='4840498']
As for C# would you it is better to learn it or C/C++ or Java? I think C is more powerful but with a much steeper learning curve
[/quote]

C# is extremely similar to Java syntax-wise, so I'd say it wouldn't make much of a difference between those two
I would not recommend starting out with C or C++ since you'll have to take into account certain aspects (eg. memory management) which C# or Java already take into account on their own so you can actually focus on general programming concepts

As stated before in this thread, start out with some simple 'Hello World' applications, mess around a bit and see what works and what doesn't so you can get a feel for the language

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beatlefan    198
[quote name='daedalus316' timestamp='1311686297' post='4840498']
As for C# would you it is better to learn it or C/C++ or Java? I think C is more powerful but with a much steeper learning curve
[/quote]

I would go with C#, it's easier to learn and to work with than C++, yet still has most, if not all, of the power of C++.

Also, have you watched thenewboston's programming tutorials on youtube? He explains things very well, though he doesn't have any C# tutorials.

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daedalus316    119
Have you ever used gamemaker? I have always looked at rpg maker as a drag and drop not much freedom to create type of program. Also did you say C++ was an initial langauage as in i should start with it? And can anyone suggest and engine with wich to start?

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No I suggested C# or Ruby as an intial language to start with, I've used Game Maker once or twice way back when and I never liked it. RPG Maker is very drag and drop but the freedom you can gain from scripting is quite large some people have even developed systems for creating ORPG's for example. I'd highly recommend Unity3D as a base engine to start with or the XNA framework as I said earlier both of these utilize C# (Unity3D using both C# and Javascript).

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daedalus316    119
Ok so i'll see what i can do in unity. One more thing. My freind has reasearched UDK and really likes it. Do you know what scripting language it uses and would it be a viable option for me?

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Radikalizm    4807
[quote name='daedalus316' timestamp='1311688439' post='4840528']
Ok so i'll see what i can do in unity. One more thing. My freind has reasearched UDK and really likes it. Do you know what scripting language it uses and would it be a viable option for me?
[/quote]

UDK uses a scripting language called unrealscript which has a Java-like syntax if I remember correctly

I would really suggest you get some general programming experience first though, just jumping into an unfamiliar programming environment without any previous experience could get difficult

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beatlefan    198
[quote name='daedalus316' timestamp='1311688439' post='4840528']
Ok so i'll see what i can do in unity. One more thing. My freind has reasearched UDK and really likes it. Do you know what scripting language it uses and would it be a viable option for me?
[/quote]

It uses a C++ like language called UnrealScript, why wouldn't it be a viable option?

Edit: Darn Radikalizm beat me.

If you do want to go with UDK, i again recommend watching thenewboston on youtube. He has a C++ beginners tutorial, which you should watch first, and he just finished his beginners UDK tutorials and moving on to the advance tutorials.

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daedalus316    119
I was asking it was not stating it. I was just wondering if it was smple enough for complete beginner to use. And would be hard enough for me to gain some experience. Also how would you suggest i get the pure programming experience. Any tutorials?

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I linked Dream in Code earlier, look up the thread I'm sure you'll find the link. As I said then the site has "pure" programming tutorials for most languages. I wouldn't say its not simple enough to use however as previously stated you are far better learning a none specific language such as Java/C#. I think you've really been given most of the information that a person can be given by this point, you've got several websites in which you could get tutorials from the rest is down to you to try and see what you like and want to learn.

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J*A*G    100
Stanford has a nice beginner friendly introductory course on programming (OpenCourseWare):
[url="http://see.stanford.edu/see/courseinfo.aspx?coll=824a47e1-135f-4508-a5aa-866adcae1111"]Programming Methodology[/url]

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daedalus316    119
The stanford course looks reallygood and simple thanks alot. Only things is Java really good for making games? I haven't heard of many great games made injava ecept Minecraft of course. And also would the same techniques taughtin the course(software engineering) be used in gamedesign

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There are a lot of games made in Java; [url="http://gamedev.stackexchange.com/questions/3789/famous-games-written-in-java"]Java Games[/url]. Techniques taught in a Software Engineering course would be transitional to Games Programming yes, also works the other way around as far as I'm aware.

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J*A*G    100
[quote name='daedalus316' timestamp='1311691961' post='4840562']
The stanford course looks reallygood and simple thanks alot. Only things is Java really good for making games? I haven't heard of many great games made injava ecept Minecraft of course. And also would the same techniques taughtin the course(software engineering) be used in gamedesign
[/quote]

I believe the course focuses on language independent fundamentals.
Also check out the assignments, I believe quite a few of them were game related.

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Tom Sloper    16040
[quote name='daedalus316' timestamp='1311691961' post='4840562']
would the same techniques taughtin the course(software engineering) be used in gamedesign
[/quote]
No. "Game design" is a different thing from game programming. You can read about game design in [url="http://gamedev.net/dict"]the gamedev dictionary[/url] and [url="http://archives.igda.org/breakingin/path_design.htm"]on IGDA.org[/url] and [url="http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson28.htm"]on my website.[/url]

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