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kneehee

Downloading zip projects DEV C++

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I was trying to download [font="'Comic Sans MS"]proj 22 bumpmaping for dev c++ bloodshed[/font]
[font="'Comic Sans MS"]its not working i guess theres a new server from what i hear.[/font]
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[/font]
[font="'Comic Sans MS"]how long do you figure it will be down?[/font]
[font="'Comic Sans MS"]
[/font]
[font="'Comic Sans MS"]thanks in advance :>[/font]

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I think he means Nehe.
But thou shall not use DevC++ anymore.


DevC++ is fine
From time to time it crashes but you can just restart it and everything is fine :P

The real problem here is NeHe
The tutorials are very old and there are many better ways of doing things today (e.g. bumpmapping with shaders)
Further they use the glaux library which are deprecated since many years
Freeglut/SDL/glfw are good replacements (freeglut can't load BMP images, glfw could load TGA but that is to be removed and I don't know about SDL)

I've downloaded an example which uses Glut and made a Code::Blocks project from it
Moving from DevC++ to Code::Blocks does not take much effort but it never crashed for me yet
You will have to put the freeglut.lib into the lib folder of Code::Blocks and the header files into the GL folder which is inside of the include folder which is inside of the MinGW folder which is inside of the Code::Blocks folder and link against freeglut
This can either be done in your project settings or in your global compiler settings
I tend for the later because I don't have to make a project for every single C file I have to compile this way
Go to "Settings" -> "Compiler and debugger" -> "Linker settings"-tab -> 2 options
1.
write "-lfreeglut" to "Other linker options"
2.
Click add at "Link libraries" and choose the freeglut.dll

There also is a library called "glut" but it is not being developed any longer and it has less options

You will also have to link -lopengl32 and -lglu32

But as I already said doing bumpmapping with shaders is faster and so you should prefer it over the following code (which is not by me, Credits to the name which is written in the comments whoever that was)

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DevC++ is fine
From time to time it crashes but you can just restart it and everything is fine :P

No, DevC++ is not fine. It is completely obsolete and using it can be just as dangerous to a beginner than using the equally outdated and bad NeHe tutorials. Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 Express is by far the best choice with regards to IDEs on Windows.

To the OP, if "proj 22 bumpmaping" refers to that nehe emboss bump tutorial, then stay away from it as far as you can. It teaches a completely outdated technique that is highly inappropriate for use on modern 3D hardware. The whole set of legacy NeHe turorials is about as useful for writing a modern 3D engine as a prehistoric cave painting about a wheel is for constructing the landing gear of an airplane.

You should look into shader based bump mapping instead. There are many examples on the net. Maybe someone can post a link to a good tutorial.

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[quote name='EVIL_ENT' timestamp='1312707521' post='4845716']
DevC++ is fine
From time to time it crashes but you can just restart it and everything is fine :P

No, DevC++ is not fine. It is completely obsolete and using it can be just as dangerous to a beginner than using the equally outdated and bad NeHe tutorials. Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 Express is by far the best choice with regards to IDEs on Windows.[/quote]

Dev-C++ has not been updated since 2005 and is not currently maintained

but it still works (excluding the crashes)

Dev-C++ lacks many of the features of newer IDEs

which I don't need
That's the reason why I don't like MSVC++
I am not writing triple a titles, just a tiny bumpmapping test
It is not by accident that so many people new to programming start with DevC++

Let's say I want to write a simple program

DevCpp:
1. Google -> download devcpp -> click the first link
2. Install
3. Run
4. Write code
5. Compile
This can be done in a few minutes

MSVC++:
1. Google -> download msvc++ -> click first link -> download?
where is the damn download button?
*click link* wrong
*click another link* wrong again
*click another link* ahhh there it is
*download*
2. Install....no
check boxes with things you never heard of before
wait a few hours until the downloader finishes
wait a few hours until everything is installed
3. Runnn..........damn this takes sooo long...and every time I click an icon with MSVC++ symbol the compiler starts and freezes my tiny laptop until it is opened
4. Write code....uhm....where?
4.1 figure out how to create a project
Why does it have so many files?
I just wanted to write "Hello World"....there's nothing written about these weird files in my tutorial
4.2 make everything work somehow
5. Run
6. Send program to friends to show how cool you are and finally managed to compile "Hello World" with MSVC++
Friends tell you it crashes and says that some dlls are missing

This can easily take a day or more depending on your internet connection speed, your patience and luck

Following on from point #2, the debugging facilities provided by Dev-C++ are far inferior to those available in other free options

I never really debugged anything because I did not need to
Might be true

Error messages and the steps required to solve them are not well documented

Just copy&paste the error message to google and you are fine

The compiler that ships with the Dev-C++ IDE is outdated

but it still works

The “devpack” system provided for working with 3rd party libraries is no longer maintained or supported

Never needed that

MSVC++ might be the most awesome tool ever to make big projects but its complexity is overwhelming for beginners
Learning to walk should be done before flying airplanes
If you are some awesome dude who is able to fly airplanes first, sure, go ahead
I really don't want to argue about this for much longer
I just wanted to point out a few reasons why it can be easier to start with DevCpp instead


and here is some code for bumpmapping with glsl
it's hacked together from various sources but it does not require setting up more libraries than freeglut

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Then use something like CodeLight if you want a leightweight solution.
There are no excuses for using DevC++.


sure there are excuses
I never heared of that IDE (and I guess it did not exist when I started)

but let's be serious
- it requires making a project file, even for compiling code with just a single C file
- the inbuilt file explorer shows files with are not there
- the workspace I created is not where I created it
- the example hello world project does not display hello world
- program crashes at exit
- workspace and last project is lost after restarting
- "Recent workspaces >" and "Recent Files >" does not expand (probably gone)

after trying a few times most things work (some more with admin rights)

+ nice interface with big buttons (although it is a '-' on my laptop since the screen is rather small)
+ compatible with Code::Blocks

The name is misleading
Code::Blocks is smaller and executes faster

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Well, go ahead then. Use that IDE if you insist. :cool:
Who am I to question that :).

- it requires making a project file, even for compiling code with just a single C file[/quote]
Spawn a console: gcc myfile.c -o myexe.exe

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I never really debugged anything because I did not need to


Leaving aside the rest of your points (which I'd argue seem to be based more on prejudice than anything else), this one is a bit of an eye-opener. If you think you don't have bugs, if you think you don't need a debugger, then you've got quite a lot to learn and quite a long way to go in order to learn it.

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