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Can someone help me with tileset dimension

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Hello everyone, I am really a beginner (I mostly learn programming and design by self-taught only as a hobby) so your understanding is much appreciated.

I am currently trying to make some sort of RPG-platformer game.

The main character image I am currently using is 70x100 pixels. I think it is rather big compared to other games? But I use 70x100 because it looks nice, so that the player can clearly see the action of the character since it is an RPG, not just a platformer (examples of what the main character would do: swing swords or other melee weapons, shoot arrows).

But the question I arrived at now is, what tile dimension should I use, considering the image size of the characters in the game is about 70x100. Standard tilesets I encounter surfing the web is 64x64, but it seems to be too small, the repetitiveness of the tileset would be seen because the maps I am making involve much greater dimensions. So I tried to make my own 128x128. It looks much better. At least quite as I expect how the game would look like. But sometimes, it feels rather big [img]http://public.gamedev.net/public/style_emoticons/default/huh.gif[/img]

So I'm wondering what you guys would recommend. Why is it that 128x128 does not seem to be a standard dimension? Or is it standard? And why do tilesets have standards in the first place, like 16x16, 32x32, 64x64? Or is 50x50 just as fine? And is there a simple guideline to determine what tileset dimension I should use if, for example, my character size is 'x' pixels by width and 'y' pixels by height? Because how I determine 128x128 is better than 64x64 is just by feelings, so although I'm pretty sure 128x128 is better than 64x64 for my game, I'm not sure if 128x128 is the best.

I look forward to hear from you guys who have more experience in this. Thank you for your help [img]http://public.gamedev.net/public/style_emoticons/default/smile.gif[/img]

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"why do tilesets have standards in the first place, like 16x16, 32x32, 64x64? Or is 50x50 just as fine?"

Well, one reason is historic; power-of-two numbers are easy to manipulate quickly. Games on 8bit computers and consoles often used 16x16 tiles because it was a compromise between detail, storage space for the tiles, and being able to access the pixel data quickly.

In addition screen sizes were also often powers-of-two. For example on the CPC, 16x16 tiles means you can have a 20x10 screen with 40 pixel lines left over for a status display at the bottom.

When hardware assist started to appear for the graphics, it was often power-of-two oriented, again for hardware simplicity reasons. Early OpenGL and DirectX (and other APIs such as Glide) similarly limited textures to 256x256 for hardware reasons, meaning that 16x16 or 32x32 tiles would fit better and not waste precious texture memory.

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"is there a simple guideline to determine what tileset dimension I should use"

Not really. Some games use very small tiles and create variety in the layouts. Others use larger tiles which can themselves contain variety.

It really does depend on the style of your game. Large tiles will work well if you have (say) lots of open space. If you're writing a cramped tunnel and ladders environment, making the tiles close in size to the character may work better -- because if your tiles are much larger than your character, you can't make a shaft that the figure will only just fit into.


Note that the tile size, the grid size and the character size can all be different. You can have 32x32 graphics on a 20x20 grid. Why would you do this? Well, it gives you the ability to overlap your tiles at the edges if you want. Likewise, you can have a player graphic of 70pixels running on a grid of 64... it will give you some flexibility at the edges to overlap things if you need.

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