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mauro78

Fractured Mesh / Texture

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Hi All!

I'm wondering what it's the best technique or if someone can give me an hint about texturing the "fractured" parts of a mesh.

Actually we've implemented something like this:
a) we've a mesh tagged as "destructable"
b) once hitted it's splitted in "n" new meshes
c) every new mesh is physical driven so the effects is very nice ^_^

Questions arises when I need to assign new texture coord to the new vertices of splitted mesh.
For glass textures this can be handled very easily; for mesh surfaces textured with a texture pattern I can simply "try" to texture the nex pieces creating a "planar map".

All those above cases are "simple"; but what about re-texturing a mesh like this one http://imageshack.us...mpartwip03.jpg/

I mean is real-time fracture used only on simple objects (like rocks or walls) or there is a way to re-texture complex objects?

Help or reference/papers appreciated ^_^

Bye


p.s.



basically what I'm missing from this video (from my current engine) is the computing the new texcoords; I just can split the original mesh correctly.

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basically what I'm missing from this video (from my current engine) is the computing the new texcoords; I just can split the original mesh correctly.


I've gone about it by generating the coordinates via basic projections. Each edge/face is tagged with their corresponding back face & material type. Those edges correspond to the Left and Right edge of the split, and are 0 and 1 of the texcoords U respectively, and the V gets set to 0 and 1 or 1 and 0 randomly.

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basically what I'm missing from this video (from my current engine) is the computing the new texcoords; I just can split the original mesh correctly.


I've gone about it by generating the coordinates via basic projections. Each edge/face is tagged with their corresponding back face & material type. Those edges correspond to the Left and Right edge of the split, and are 0 and 1 of the texcoords U respectively, and the V gets set to 0 and 1 or 1 and 0 randomly.

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It was my understanding that pre-fracturing is still very in vogue those days. Do you guys confirm?

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It was my understanding that pre-fracturing is still very in vogue those days. Do you guys confirm?


Prefracturing helps the artists get the look and feel they want, but can be time consuming.
Sometimes its the only way to get the what you want, sometimes the overhead of all of the precreated filler geo is too high.

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[quote name='mauro78' timestamp='1313859658' post='4851658']
basically what I'm missing from this video (from my current engine) is the computing the new texcoords; I just can split the original mesh correctly.


I've gone about it by generating the coordinates via basic projections. Each edge/face is tagged with their corresponding back face & material type. Those edges correspond to the Left and Right edge of the split, and are 0 and 1 of the texcoords U respectively, and the V gets set to 0 and 1 or 1 and 0 randomly.
[/quote]

I'm doing the same right now with a simple projection....It dosn't look that bad I'm looking on more robust method.....I hope I'll find some research paper ^__^

I'm trying to "remap" mesh original UV to the "fractured" faces at TOI (Time of impact) and generate new "splitted" verticies UV interpolating ...tricky ^__*

Thanks for suggestion

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