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Luke11cnc

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[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"]I would like to say hello [/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"] [/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"]I am writing this post on behalf of my 10-year-old son.[/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"] [/font]

[font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"]As many young children my son as well spend 90%of there free time on a computer, DS,PSP or some kind of [size="4"] video game, it's only natural they want to be a games designer when they grow up.[/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"] [/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"]My son is already spending his money on his chosen Job (A GAMES DESIGNER) "I'M GOING TO LIVE IN TOKYOAND BUY A BIG HOUSE WHERE YOU CAN VISIT ME " nowt his is not just a whim he’s been going on like this for years and years I did down load blender last year but after I did he said “I don’t want to be a visualdesigner” I do forget what he said ‘I’m a dad and NOT hearing what your kids want is built in to my DNA’[/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"] [/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"]So with all his plans in place what does he need to do, to get on the ladder?[/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"] [/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"]What qualifications should he be looking at[/font]
[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"]What programs for designing should he be looking at?[/font]
[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"] [/font]
[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"]He did mention C code……. So what book/program should he be reading/working with? [/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"] [/font]

[font="Arial Narrow"][size="5"][color="#ff00ff"]I must say I thought it would all die down by now, but it he getting more and more determined to be a games designer[/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"] [/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"]So this is a father’s plea for help, SOS [/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"] [/font]

[color="black"][font="Arial Narrow"][size="4"]James (father)[/font]
[font="Arial Narrow"]I would like to thank you for reading this and your replies in advance
[/font]
[font="Arial Narrow"]
[/font]
[font="Arial Narrow"]Thank you [/font]

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He must first learn programming and I would suggest something along the lines of C# and not C. For a 10 year old it would burn him out quick and he would give up. C and C++ are complex languages and a 10 year old might see it as gibberish right now.

Also, I would not worry about game development right now. I would worry about learning the logic, system environment, coding habits, etc. While he is learning that he can be reading about the latest game technologies and techniques just to be familiar with it and to keep up to date on them. It is important that he first learns and get's comfortable with a language though.

Once he is comfortable he could start using XNA, which is an SDK released from Microsoft that allows someone to write games for Windows, XBOX 360, etc. That would be a good SDK to learn graphics and game development.

Way down the road I would suggest C / C++ and either DirectX or OpenGL as those are the libraries used in professional studios. The C# and XNA are great for learning, but you can't do low level console development with it; only indie games. To get to this point could take a while so tell him to be patient and not to get aggravated.

Finally, I would suggest he creates an account here and get's to know the community. There are many professional game developers here and I'm sure they would be more than happy to help him regardless of his age. Also, kudos to you for not tearing his dream down and trying to help him.

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Lego Mindstorm

Granted, it will bankrupt you, but it is the absolute perfect introduction to programming for a 10 year old. Additionally as it gets more complex you can actually "extend" the programming language with much more complex programming.

Oh, and italics, ew. Your post was literally extremely difficult to read. Also, I almost completely dismissed it as spam because of the font/italics/pink.

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Hello there!

When I was eleven, I started creating games by using good old RPG Maker 2000. This would help me understand programming logic, the use of variables, decision making, loop structures, and would be fast and fun way to see results, while still teaching me A LOT.

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By ten years old I'd already been programming for two years and while yes it was hard it was also one of the most fun learning periods I've ever had! Don't underestimate your kids - they can learn a hell of a lot more advanced topics then you'd think.

Now, if your son shows no interest in the technical nature of programming, try visual arts or level design as an alternative. There are plenty of beginner books around, as a low-cost alternative I recommend The Gamemaker's Apprentice - an excellent book for starters wanting to dive in quickly and get their first game made. Additionally, Game Maker is a fairly simple program to work with and the cost of buying the full version is very low ($20~ something last I checked). From there, he can learn the general process of working on a game while having lots of fun along the way - and if he's determined enough, he'll end up with something playable at the end! biggrin.gif

Good luck! :)

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Game Maker, RPG Make, XYZ Maker, etc are good, but it's also a double edged sword. You are learning a proprietary language / script that is of no use once you are done with it. What if he decides next year he is done with games and wants to move to application development? He would have to start all over now to learn another language. That's why I think it's best to learn a standard language. Teaches you the same logic and what not, but you are also learning a lot more about the system you are on (file system, Win32 API (for example), etc.

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By ten years old I'd already been programming for two years and while yes it was hard it was also one of the most fun learning periods I've ever had! Don't underestimate your kids - they can learn a hell of a lot more advanced topics then you'd think.

Now, if your son shows no interest in the technical nature of programming, try visual arts or level design as an alternative. There are plenty of beginner books around, as a low-cost alternative I recommend The Gamemaker's Apprentice - an excellent book for starters wanting to dive in quickly and get their first game made. Additionally, Game Maker is a fairly simple program to work with and the cost of buying the full version is very low ($20~ something last I checked). From there, he can learn the general process of working on a game while having lots of fun along the way - and if he's determined enough, he'll end up with something playable at the end! biggrin.gif

Good luck! :)


Yeah, I was 8 when I started programming.

Then again, I didn't have much choice, my Dad bought me an Atari 800xl ( sweet!) then promptly deleted the OS ( doh! ) leaving me with a new computer and nothing but the ROMed basic to play with.

That experience set me on the path to becoming a professional developer AND put my Dad down the path of a pathological fear of computers.

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Game Maker, RPG Make, XYZ Maker, etc are good, but it's also a double edged sword. You are learning a proprietary language / script that is of no use once you are done with it. What if he decides next year he is done with games and wants to move to application development? He would have to start all over now to learn another language. That's why I think it's best to learn a standard language. Teaches you the same logic and what not, but you are also learning a lot more about the system you are on (file system, Win32 API (for example), etc.



When you get into college, the first thing you learn is a pseudo language. It will not be of any use in the future, but will help you the general structure of an algorithm. Thats the reason I pointed in the RPG Maker direction. Sure you wont be able to use it in the future, but a lot of learning how to program is learning how to program, language independent, isnt it so?

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I'd also recommend C# or maybe whatever current version of Visual Basic is out there. There's a lot of stuff that an ambitious kid should be able to learn but I'm thinking there aren't too many lessons geared towards such a young audience. Learn stuff like getting input, displaying that on the screen, conditional statements, and loops. After a lot of practice with that stuff maybe look at trying to get some sort of image on the screen and moving it around.

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