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How long until c++ disapear from game development

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As an informatics engineer i do realize that managed language are the future. I think that C++ and company will be a thing from the past in a few years, how many I dont know

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Where I think that managed languages will be the feature for many of the applications written, I don't think it will be for game programming. Raw performance, control over memory allocation/deallocation, multi-platform development without needing an intermediate language/framework will keep native languages in this business, I think. I do think there wil be a large space for managed languages in tool development, or as a replacement for various scripting languages.

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Not gonna happen anytime soon but it's difficult to even guess if it may ever happen. Managed languages are cool for certain, but they were primarily designed to solve a different class of programming problem. Sure they can be used for games, and quite well too, but they still bring their own overheads (e.g. in startup times, JITting code causing unpredictable latency, unpredictable garbage collection times causing unpreditable hitches and stalls, the dreaded boxing and unboxing, limitations of running in a sandbox, etc etc etc yadda yadda yadda). None of these are unsolvable, but the current generation is just not there yet.

Aside from that there is just a huge legacy codebase in C or C++, with being able to link with C remaining a primary standard for libraries. That'll take a good deal of time and effort to deal with, and that would be time and effort that many will see as being better invested in creating something cool and new.

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Never is a stupid answer, that means that in a million years time people will still be using c++. I cant believe that most people chose that option. I chose 20, but I think it will actually take a lot longer than that. As yet, no language *with similar semantics* (please don't start telling me that java and C# are going to replace c++, you've been telling me that for 10 years) has yet been developed. When it is, c++ will be replaced.

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I think that C++ and company will be a thing from the past in a few years, how many I dont know[/quote]

Let me put things into perspective here.

No software today can be written without using C or C++. Web development likes to hype how they are managed - using databases written in C/C++, running on OSes written in C/C++, using servers written in C/C++ and languages written in C/C++ accessed by browsers written in C/C++.

Not one of those has so far been replicated to satisfactory level in managed language.


So yes, just like artists can use Photoshop without knowing anything about programming, so will C and C++ diminish. But today, in 2011, managed languages are incapable of providing even the rudimentary facilities needed to provide even the most basic real world solutions.

As an informatics engineer i do realize that managed language are the future.[/quote]
No, they are the past. First computer languages were "managed" and running on virtual machines.

The reason unmanaged languages appeared is because of horrible impedance mismatch between the way hardware works and the way programmers are forced to think. This mismatch, especially in informatics sector is due to race to bottom.

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I bet C++ will live for while yet (for reasons already mentioned).

However, in 20 years, it would not surprise me if computers just program themselves, and leave the more human type stuff for us (like art & design). :)

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I think that C++ and company will be a thing from the past in a few years, how many I dont know


Let me put things into perspective here.

No software today can be written without using C or C++. Web development likes to hype how they are managed - using databases written in C/C++, running on OSes written in C/C++, using servers written in C/C++ and languages written in C/C++ accessed by browsers written in C/C++.

Not one of those has so far been replicated to satisfactory level in managed language.


So yes, just like artists can use Photoshop without knowing anything about programming, so will C and C++ diminish. But today, in 2011, managed languages are incapable of providing even the rudimentary facilities needed to provide even the most basic real world solutions.

As an informatics engineer i do realize that managed language are the future.[/quote]
No, they are the past. First computer languages were "managed" and running on virtual machines.

The reason unmanaged languages appeared is because of horrible impedance mismatch between the way hardware works and the way programmers are forced to think. This mismatch, especially in informatics sector is due to race to bottom.
[/quote]

remember c++ code is translated to asm code I bet that in 20 years PCs will have frameworks installed on the hardware (like DX) and then c++ will die. Programming is evolving in the way that, no matter how is done, software has to be written in the way you think, take a look at python

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Voted 20, which is a massive underestimate but to say "never" is absurd, because it means after the heat death of the universe Lovecraftian horrors will be programming in C++.

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