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Unity How do you organize your classes and their respective implementation files?

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Hey Everyone,

Anyways, I am constantly debating with myself about how I should organize and write my code (e.g. where I should put whitespaces, etc.), and once again I am at another dilemma. I want to make my classes look more professionally organized, but because I am mostly a self-taught programmer, I don't get a lot of insight on good ways of organizing my code. So I am asking the GameDev community: How do you guys organize your classes and class implementations? For example, do you structure members first by private and public members, or by declarations and functions? Do you organize your source files in order of where members appear in the header, or by some other method (i.e. alphabetical order)? I was originally going to make this into a poll, but I found my choices were getting way too complicated.

Thanks in advance for all of your feedback. biggrin.gif Please feel free to mention other ways in which you organize your classes!

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I feel your pain. Suggest finding a style that you like and then stick to it. Some style guides (I use bitsquid in my personal projects and a style that shall remain unmentioned - for your own safety - at work):
http://google-styleg...nk/cppguide.xml
http://bitsquid.blog...ding-style.html

And some awesome tools that you can set up to automatically reformat your code:
http://uncrustify.sourceforge.net/
http://universalinde...ourceforge.net/


Writing with a consistent style is great and IMO helps readability. So make sure that when you are editing other peoples' code that you use their conventions!

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"Suggest finding a style that you like and then stick to it."

I would argue against the 'stick to it' bit, obviously it is wise to use a consistant style throughout any project but you should allways be aware that their probably a better style out there.

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I feel your pain. Suggest finding a style that you like and then stick to it. Some style guides (I use bitsquid in my personal projects and a style that shall remain unmentioned - for your own safety - at work):
http://google-styleg...nk/cppguide.xml
http://bitsquid.blog...ding-style.html

And some awesome tools that you can set up to automatically reformat your code:
http://uncrustify.sourceforge.net/
http://universalinde...ourceforge.net/


Writing with a consistent style is great and IMO helps readability. So make sure that when you are editing other peoples' code that you use their conventions!



Thanks for the links! smile.gif I understand that it is good to keep a consistent style at least across a project, but related to what Jim1664 said, I created this topic post in order to gather different styles from the GameDev community and pick elements from each that I like. So to add onto what I originally posted:

Share a particular styling rule that you think is great in making code better organized and/or easier to read. This can include many things such as white spaces, number of spaces before starting a new line, etc. If you can, provide reason(s) as to why you think it works well. Let's get a discussion happening!

It is difficult to say what is the best style, but I would love to hear things that coders have discovered really work for them.

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This is always going to be a subjective conversation. There is no objectivity to be had.

Some people like spaces. I like tabs. Some people like K&R bracing. I like the bracing style that isn't fuck-ugly.

We can argue back and forth about this all month, and neither side will ever really be convinced.


Pick something that looks nice to you, and stick with it within a given codebase. If you decide later that something else looks nicer, feel free to switch. It's 2011, we should all be using pretty-printers on our code anyways, so it should never actually matter.

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This is always going to be a subjective conversation. There is no objectivity to be had.

Some people like spaces. I like tabs. Some people like K&R bracing. I like the bracing style that isn't fuck-ugly.

We can argue back and forth about this all month, and neither side will ever really be convinced.


Pick something that looks nice to you, and stick with it within a given codebase. If you decide later that something else looks nicer, feel free to switch. It's 2011, we should all be using pretty-printers on our code anyways, so it should never actually matter.


Well I know this kind of stuff is mostly subjective, I just wanted to see what styles other programmers use in case I never thought of a good method or a good reason for that method. There would be no need for people to point fingers and tell the other person that their style seems absurd. That's not what I want at all, so I guess it was wrong of me to try to promote a "discussion". Rather, this is more of "show-and-tell".

By the way, what do you mean by K&R bracing?

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[font="Consolas"]"By the way, what do you mean by K&R bracing?[/font]"

Its the style used in the 'C Programming Language', by Kernighan and (someone else whos name begins with an R)

Which is;


void function( ... )
{
doSumfink();
for( int a = 10; --a; ) {
doSummitElse();
}
}



By comparison, I use.


void Function( ... ) {
DoSumfink();
for( int a = 10; --a; ) {
DoSummitElse();
}
}


Edit: That guys name is Ritchie, not knowing annoyed me so I had to google it, or bing actualy but 'bing it' isn't quite the same.

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Well I know this kind of stuff is mostly subjective, I just wanted to see what styles other programmers use in case I never thought of a good method or a good reason for that method. There would be no need for people to point fingers and tell the other person that their style seems absurd. That's not want I want at all, so I guess it was wrong of me to try to promote a "discussion". Rather, this is more of "show-and-tell".


Fair enough smile.gif

You can see examples of my formatting style at http://epoch-language.googlecode.com/ and http://scribblings-by-apoch.googlecode.com/

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[font="Consolas"]"By the way, what do you mean by K&R bracing?[/font]"

Its the style used in the 'C Programming Language', by Kernighan and (someone else whos name begins with an R)

Which is;


void function( ... )
{
doSumfink();
for( int a = 10; --a; ) {
doSummitElse();
}
}



By comparison, I use.


void Function( ... ) {
DoSumfink();
for( int a = 10; --a; ) {
DoSummitElse();
}
}


Edit: That guys name is Ritchie, not knowing annoyed me so I had to google it, or bing actualy but 'bing it' isn't quite the same.


I see. So from what I can tell, K&R bracing is where they leave the first brace on the same line as the function call? I much rather have my braces have their own line. I feel like I can lose track of where I am enclosing the scope of a particular chunk of code. I too like capitalizing functions names so that I can tell them apart from my variables - it's just something I found appealing when I was learning C#.


[quote name='Robot Ninja' timestamp='1316341910' post='4863002']
Well I know this kind of stuff is mostly subjective, I just wanted to see what styles other programmers use in case I never thought of a good method or a good reason for that method. There would be no need for people to point fingers and tell the other person that their style seems absurd. That's not want I want at all, so I guess it was wrong of me to try to promote a "discussion". Rather, this is more of "show-and-tell".


Fair enough smile.gif

You can see examples of my formatting style at http://epoch-language.googlecode.com/ and http://scribblings-b...googlecode.com/
[/quote]

Very cool. I clearly have a lot to learn in C++, because a lot of the source code is still out of the scope of my understanding. laugh.gif

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Here are a few ideas to consider.


L. Spiro


Wow, a very comprehensive guide targeted directly towards people like me. laugh.gif Awesome. I've been contemplating using Hungarian notation, but I never really decided on a priority tree for writing the letters. Your guide certainly gave me a better idea, thanks. It also seems to make sense that public class members may be better displayed at the top of the class for accessibility reasons. I was never sure what other people did for that, especially when class members are private by default. dry.gif My primary reason for making this post was to find out how other people organized their classes, which you also answered in your guide - thanks again!

I didn't anything mentioning how you organize your source file. Do you just order the code by how they appear in your header?

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Indeed I forget to mention that, so I will update my article.
Functions in the .CPP files appear in exactly the same order as those in the .H files. Same with inlined functions at the bottom of .H files.


L. Spiro

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