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Discount_Flunky

Hows this for a leveling system

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[font="Calibri"]I've been experimenting with a leveling system were the xp required to level up eventually gets really high but it's not impossible to reach. It's a 0-100 level system. I have attached a table and a graph here that shows the progression. I'm wondering if the xp amounts required to level are too high or too small. Although the numbers look big they might actually be too small because killing a high end enemy can yield 1000+ xp, and you get xp for successful crafting attempts and such. In fact since I want every play style to be rewarded almost everything you do gives you xp so maybe it needs to be way higher.

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You're doing it backwards. Xp to next level is derived from how much xp per time unit the player can get(time to kill something, craft, etc) and how long you want each level to last.

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You're doing it backwards. Xp to next level is derived from how much xp per time unit the player can get(time to kill something, craft, etc) and how long you want each level to last.



Well I'm hoping by making each level take much more xp then the one before each one will take longer to get, but the thing is as time goes on the player will be able to get xp much faster than they could before. I'm not sure were the balance is.

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Then you need to figure out what activities the player will be doing at each level and how much xp/time these will reward. There are many ways to do this and they don't always involve increasing xp to next level. It's a result of the design goals, not the basis of the system.

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1) What Tiblanc said.
2) You don't do it via inventing "XP table" but "XP formula". Example: experienceRequired=level*level*10.

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Decide how long do you want the player to stay at each level. Then take into consideration all the activities that yield EXP. Create a blend and adjust the values so that you achieve the minimum time it takes to level. Grindtest and prototype.

Upfront, for all you know, you could draw a graph in the shape of a rhino, it will be as valid as anything else :)

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Ya it sounds like it will take a while to get it right. The reason I'm going this now though is that I really want to get the leveling scale out too the programmers, because so many other things depend on the leveling system, such as [font="Calibri"][color="#1c2837"]enemy[/font] NPC stats and PC hp. I could try using an formula as was suggested, since I already have lots of formulas for the game.

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Basically, toss "anything" in, and keep ready to balance them later.
That's possibly one of the last things you'll want to balance, thus, its pointless to start with this now.
Tiblanc is perfectly right: you are doing it backwards.


@Zethariel
I would be tempted to agree with the formula part, but recent games have proven successful with 'handcrafted' level tables (quite ironically).
Very present in social games to keep the level field uneven, but it seems to work better with games where leveling is not the main focus...

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I would be tempted to agree with the formula part, but recent games have proven successful with 'handcrafted' level tables (quite ironically).
Very present in social games to keep the level field uneven, but it seems to work better with games where leveling is not the main focus...


All is well as long as you have time as a developer/designer to handcrat. Unless we are talking about changes during future patches that fine-tune the game -- whatever the approach, empyrical testing and tweaking is a must. Arbitrary numbers are good as a start point, but those too have to be based on tanglible data points, such as concrete EXP values gained from activities or the amount of activities that should be divided into level groups.

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but recent games have proven successful with 'handcrafted' level tables (quite ironically).
Really? Which ones (except for AD&D where it is done for the purpose of compatibility with the orignal Pen&Paper RPG system, not for gameplay or mechanics)?

Is there any benefit for handcrafing these? I mean, you will handcraft either liner or a curve shape anyway, so why not use a formula for this and forget all the hassle? Handcrafted table would make sense if there were some oddities (like suddenly after level X the requirements become linear instead of progressive or the shape of the curve changes), but I don't recall any game that had such oddity nor I can think of any benefit of implementing such oddity.

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