• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Jiggle156

Fundamentals of Game Programming?

8 posts in this topic

Firstly - New to the forums: Hello all!
Before I ask my questions, a little background info:

I have a fair knowledge of C++, have been learning/using it on and off for a touch over a year - I have a firm grasp on most concepts.
With regard to game development, I have played around in S.D.L a little, but I am relatively new to game design.

-------------

I was reading around, trying to decide on the best way forward - and this led to me believing that I needed to create a simple game engine. After getting a cold hard reality check, I have realized that in order to get anywhere with something as complicated as game design, I'm going to have to start with small, completable projects, and work my way up (I was considering a Tetris clone). Does anyone have any guidance they could offer?

Note: I am particularly confused as to what level to approach this from. Should I be creating a simple, procedural program? or should I be using state/process managers and complex class structures. Any help would be greatly appreciated :)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just pick a game or three that you'd like to tackle, and go make them! Feel free to experiment with different tools, engines, SDKs, even languages - the more equipment you have to work with, the better your chances of being able to implement your designs down the road. In particular, don't feel confined to C++; if it seems like you're spending more time than you'd like wrestling with mundane stuff instead of getting games finished, then by all means swap to something else.

Other than that... just hack away, and pay attention to things that seem unpleasant or sticky - those are areas where you might be able to improve your programming. If you catch yourself feeling like "there's got to be a better way to do this" then heed that instinct - it'll serve you well. Don't worry too much about getting it perfect or even all that "right" to begin with; the best way to learn how to improve is to make mistakes and analyze them.

Final thought: keep it simple. Do the simplest thing that could possibly work. It isn't worth wasting time on complex reusable architectures or engines or whatever if that gets in the way of you doing what you're interested in.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Okay then, so I'll have a bash at Tetris, and see how that goes. Is it acceptable to post the code on the forums for people to make suggestions?
Thanks Apoch :)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Jiggle' timestamp='1317625082' post='4868498']
Okay then, so I'll have a bash at Tetris, and see how that goes. Is it acceptable to post the code on the forums for people to make suggestions?
[/quote]
it's fine to post code. When you get stuck on something, we encourage you to post all relevant code, and a screenshot of your game if it sheds any light on the problem. People often post too little code for others to help without asking that more be posted. Also, post exact error messages. But if you just want a code review, put it on github or google code or some other repository and provide a link. Uselessly excessively long posts are the root of some evil.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You should not use the native version of C++ for high level game logic because finding memory leaks and protecting against access violation will take away your creativity and waste most of your time.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Or just use boost::shared_ptrs for everything, and then you won't have memory leaks.

Honestly, tetris really shouldn't involve that many memory allocations. I recall writing tetris clones in 20-30 lines of BASIC on 8-bit micros with fixed length arrays and things.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Katie' timestamp='1317650983' post='4868556']
Or just use boost::shared_ptrs for everything, and then you won't have memory leaks.

Honestly, tetris really shouldn't involve that many memory allocations. I recall writing tetris clones in 20-30 lines of BASIC on 8-bit micros with fixed length arrays and things.
[/quote]

This. In fact, I'd bet you could write a Tetris game without using new or malloc() once in your own code, if you really wanted to.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I see this question quite a lot on game development forums.  I have decided to start a new video tutorial series that will address this concern by choosing a simple 2D single screen game (like pacman for instance) and show how to make it from scratch.<br /><br />I've called out the public to suggest which game I should make and shortly I will be choosing one from all the submissions and start to code.  Keep an eye on my website!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0