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OpenGL Books to start openGl

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Im am having problems learning openGl with tutorials and guides on the internet. I am actually interested to learn how graphics work in my case opengl and how does openGL works before going further with gaps in my mind end then just wonder why this why that.

i was planing to start reading the red book then learn some vector math and matrices, optimization and then thinking for big things.

im using lwjgl but as i can see a C/C++ and java do not differ a lot in terms of method names. I am also thinking to go with jogl due to better documentation but i just dont like the way it works with all those jframes. to me lwjgl looks better and more like C/C++ style but it just lacks the documentation. still have to try more jogl before uni starts next monday so i need to decide.

thanks

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Im am having problems learning openGl with tutorials and guides on the internet. I am actually interested to learn how graphics work in my case opengl and how does openGL works before going further with gaps in my mind end then just wonder why this why that.

i was planing to start reading the red book then learn some vector math and matrices, optimization and then thinking for big things.

im using lwjgl but as i can see a C/C++ and java do not differ a lot in terms of method names. I am also thinking to go with jogl due to better documentation but i just dont like the way it works with all those jframes. to me lwjgl looks better and more like C/C++ style but it just lacks the documentation. still have to try more jogl before uni starts next monday so i need to decide.

thanks


Learning "how graphics works" is not necessarily the same thing as learning a graphics API like OpenGL. If you want to learn how graphics actually works, there are many books out there that will teach you the subject because you can learn it without ever knowing any one particular API or you could even write your own API. I'm assuming this isn't what you want.

For OpenGL, it depends if you want to learn modern OpenGL (versions 3 or 4) or classic OpenGL. For modern, about the only book out there right now is the Superbible 5th edition (blue book). For classic, there's already a lot of references and tutorials on the internet. The red book 7th edition will help you if you want to learn classic OpenGL; it doesn't really teach the modern way of doing things regardless of what the cover says. It's more of a reference, not a tutorial--not that much better than downloading the specification docs.

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and can i know what is the difference of classic and modern openGL. i have to pick up one of them before uni starts so that i will read a bit when i have free time .

my mind is gonna blow now X(

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and can i know what is the difference of classic and modern openGL. i have to pick up one of them before uni starts so that i will read a bit when i have free time .

my mind is gonna blow now X(


I would suggest Real Time Rendering as a first step. It's terse but will give you the best overview for your purposes. http://www.amazon.com/Real-Time-Rendering-Third-Tomas-Akenine-Moller/dp/1568814240/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317696486&sr=8-1

It is a general overview and not specifically about anything you are asking about but it is similar (but much updated) from how I first learned which was by reading the now ancient: http://www.amazon.com/Computer-Graphics-Principles-Practice-2nd/dp/0201848406/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1317696593&sr=1-1. I didn't really understand a single thing in that book other than I knew I "wanted" to learn it. (I read the first version, not 2nd, so guess how long ago that way.. :))

Before you learn "OpenGL" specifically i suggest you learn the vectors and matrices first. Learning OpenGL is a subset of learning the math behind 3D, without the math it is extremely difficult to understand what you are doing and debug things. I never really understood why learning Geometry and Algebra was a good thing until I started doing 3D. You need the ability to picture the geometry of vector math in your head, how to solve sometimes complicated algebra etc because without it, "using" OpenGL (and others) becomes much more difficult than it should be. I know pretty pictures is the goal and unfortunately it takes patience to be able to do it well.

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and can i know what is the difference of classic and modern openGL. i have to pick up one of them before uni starts so that i will read a bit when i have free time .

my mind is gonna blow now X(


It's kind of like asking what's the difference between DirectX 9 and DirectX 11. Modern versions require newer graphics cards to run and they have a steeper learning curve. This is mostly do to the deprecation of immediate mode and holding the programmer responsible for doing the math; you also have to use shaders as they are no longer optional. So realistically, you'd be learning several things at the same time before even getting a triangle on the screen. You can easily see the differences for yourself. If you are reading the red book or if you have ever browsed the code on NeHe's site, then you are seeing classic OpenGL. To see modern how OpenGL works, try the arcsynthesis website. This forum's FAQ also has more links to sites that will help you learn modern OpenGL.

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