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Tquila

Game project in coherence with study

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Sorry for the vague title, it can always be a bit tricky to get those right.

Basically, I'm studying Software Engineering (Something along the lines of Computer Science in USA but with a more practical approach) at university, which is all good. I'm on first semester and we're currently learning C where most my knowledge is equal to the contents of "Problem Solving and Program Design in C sixth edition", which is all good. In class we naturally have a lot of terminal/console type programming. Solve something based on user input and return an output which has been chewed through by an algorithm. However, this can 1) Get a bit tedius, 2) very repetative. Both are good in the long run, but I believe that you learn best if you throw your self into unknown grounds, and collaborate the two experiences. Seeing my dream after my masters degree is to be a game developer, I thought doing some game programming would be pretty neat, and it would do well with my other tasks for university.

But but but! I've searched my buttocks off for some resources which fit me. Basically I'd like some pointers to the direction I need to go (either online articles or books). I'd prefer if the resources were C, possibly C++, although I know C# is up for next semester so it could be that too. I've looked at some source code for older games like Doom and Wolfenstein 3D, and it's no issue if the articles are making games that are really simple, as long as I can learn from it. The most basic is what I miss, and when I got my basic foundation for a game I can always expand ideas and toy with it.

So hit me with your best C-Shot! Would be greatly appreciated.

Dennis

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[quote name='Tquila' timestamp='1317680277' post='4868727']
Sorry for the vague title, it can always be a bit tricky to get those right.

Basically, I'm studying Software Engineering (Something along the lines of Computer Science in USA but with a more practical approach) at university, which is all good. I'm on first semester and we're currently learning C where most my knowledge is equal to the contents of "Problem Solving and Program Design in C sixth edition", which is all good. In class we naturally have a lot of terminal/console type programming. Solve something based on user input and return an output which has been chewed through by an algorithm. However, this can 1) Get a bit tedius, 2) very repetative. Both are good in the long run, but I believe that you learn best if you throw your self into unknown grounds, and collaborate the two experiences. Seeing my dream after my masters degree is to be a game developer, I thought doing some game programming would be pretty neat, and it would do well with my other tasks for university.

But but but! I've searched my buttocks off for some resources which fit me. Basically I'd like some pointers to the direction I need to go (either online articles or books). I'd prefer if the resources were C, possibly C++, although I know C# is up for next semester so it could be that too. I've looked at some source code for older games like Doom and Wolfenstein 3D, and it's no issue if the articles are making games that are really simple, as long as I can learn from it. The most basic is what I miss, and when I got my basic foundation for a game I can always expand ideas and toy with it.

So hit me with your best C-Shot! Would be greatly appreciated.

Dennis
[/quote]

Since you are already know C, why not use SDL? It is a great cross 2D platform library for video,input, etc. Already includes most of the things you would need in a game. Once you get bored of the 2D stuff in SDL it can easily be used with openGL
Other alternatives include SFML which is a C++ 2D library and XNA for C#
SMFL is much newer so there is less documentation for it and XNA I've heard is also a really nice API

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