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circassia

deriving

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Guys,

those values down are rotation values, the frames= time. Is it possible to determine (or is there any technique) how the animation would continue? It is a bouncing ball.
[code]
Transform Rotation
Frame degrees
0 0.976754
1 3.24782
2 6.76221
3 11.4515
4 17.2204
5 23.9403
6 31.4499
7 39.5613
8 41.1397
9 37.4979
10 34.7966
11 32.8202
12 31.5264
13 30.923
14 31.0173
15 31.8037
16 33.2615
17 35.3535
18 38.0259
19 41.2095
20 41.3825
21 40.0203
22 39.3244
23 39.1892
24 39.5702

[/code]


thank you for your brains.

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[quote name='circassia' timestamp='1318527622' post='4872251']
Guys,

those values down are rotation values, the frames= time. Is it possible to determine (or is there any technique) how the animation would continue? It is a bouncing ball.
[code]
Transform Rotation
Frame degrees
0 0.976754
1 3.24782
2 6.76221
3 11.4515
4 17.2204
5 23.9403
6 31.4499
7 39.5613
8 41.1397
9 37.4979
10 34.7966
11 32.8202
12 31.5264
13 30.923
14 31.0173
15 31.8037
16 33.2615
17 35.3535
18 38.0259
19 41.2095
20 41.3825
21 40.0203
22 39.3244
23 39.1892
24 39.5702

[/code]


thank you for your brains.
[/quote]

Guessing what comes next is more art than science. What you are looking for is called [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extrapolation"]extrapolation[/url] in numerical analysis. Basically, you have a set of (x,y) pairs and you want to know what happens outside of the domain. Try reading up on the topic in a numerical methods book or at a website then try implementing some of the many methods available and pick the one that gives the best result. Any numerical methods book will certainly have a chapter on this topic.

[url="http://www.developer.com/tech/article.php/762441/Java-in-Science-Data-Interpolation-and-Extrapolation-Using-Numerical-Methods-of-Polynomial-Fittings-Part-1.htm"]http://www.developer...ings-Part-1.htm[/url]

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If you plot the points, you'll see that they seem to follow three parabolas, which correspond to free-falling trajectories between bounces. You can select the points that clearly belong to one of the parabolas and fit the three coefficients that define a parabola for each of the three parabolas. You can then see how much lower the second bounce was than the first one, and from there deduce the elasticity of the collision. Or you can simply assume that the energy loss is such that the height of the successive bounces follows a geometric progression. That would allow you to extrapolate the position going forward.

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