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DarrenThor

Let's marry them!

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[color=#333333][font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Are there any games out there that cross database?

I wonder why aren't companies coming out with games that cross database.

Honestly, I am a casual gamer as well as a console gamer. Not sure, if the term casual gamer is appropriate but I am referring to facebook games.

I usually play casual games in my office when I need to burn some time, and when I return home I'd play my console games instead.

Then it crossed my mind, why don't developers marry both platforms and perhaps create a game that cross databases.

Just for example, if let's say you're playing something like some monster breeding games on fb, then on PS3 perhaps there's a monster RPG. But instead of starting anew, players get to play the RPG using the monsters they bred. (btw, the games do not exist, I'm simply mentioning monsters for illustration purpose).

I'm not a game programmer, so I wouldn't know the difficulty in it. It's just a simple concept I have in my mind.

How many hybrids out there who'd want to see some games that actually cross database?[/font]

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1. FB and Microsoft/Sony (depending on console) would have to agree on lots of legal stuff
2. Programmers and designers would be put through hell to actually make it happen.
3. That would make some players play on FB, which they might not like (and vice-versa for consoles)
4. Patching and keeping track of 2 independent games will be a hell for designers and programmists.
5. 2 or more companies would be taking a risk of investing into an idea that might fail.


As long as there are these 5 problems (even 1 is actually sufficient), why would they (devs and publishers) bother? They want to make money -- innovation is for those that have enough money in case of a failure.

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Insightful!

These are the sort of answers that really makes me happy.

You probably think I am crazy but I love listening to risks related to the concept.

So, what if it is developed on an iOS, would it be more possible?

Zynga has done it with their farm games, although not entirely the same with the concept I just mentioned just now.

Correct me if I am wrong, but they do have cityville FB and cityville hometown (both different game that does not share a single database), but the point is, they've manage to get some FB integration right?

I don't know how tough it might be, but having a cross database would be a point for social games.

Say, I play COD, but my girl friend would be more likely to play farm, management related based games. So if there's a new game, perhaps "weaponcraft" or something, in which social players are expected to forge a weapon. In return, since some database is linked depending on the agreement, in this term it's their weapon database. The weapon she forged in FB can be bought or picked up in COD.

I know there are lots of holes here and there, including the study of the target market before even launching the "weaponcraft". Even though if it is launched, the reception might not be as good and whatnot.

The idea is that, the social aspect is leveraged beyond the circle and encroach to a wider network. Although we generally play different games, but we might get to talk about the same topic, that's the social part beyond. Plus, it's not necessary that we must or opt or forced to play the other game related.

It's just my crazy idea, more criticisms would be great. At least you're being honest :)

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Another reason not to "cross databases" is that users on one platform may have an advantage over users on another platform, or on one platform a specific feature cannot be implemented due to platform limitations. For example, console players may be at a disadvantage to users on computers because of the improved controls (mouse + keyboard is more accurate than thumb sticks). Or people playing a Facebook game on a computer could have an advantage because of the increased screen real estate, putting users playing on a mobile device at a disadvantage because they would have to do more scrolling and zooming, thereby slowing them down or causing them to miss action happening off their screen.

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what if it is two genres that are not related but somehow they are related.

It's actually really, really impossible to conduct same game on entirely different platform, like you said.

Perhaps PS3 vs PC, or FB vs mobile OS. It's just not fair if we're on a games like FPS for example.

Plus, it would not be wise for dev/publishers to do so because most likely people will stick to the console that they are most comfortable with.

Not to mention that the demographics of both consoles are entirely different, FB casual gamers would not want to play COD with me.

But, if there's something related yet not entirely binding.

Say, again if there's a weapon crafting game on FB, casual players get to forge their weapons.

Then there's another action game on iOS (easier since they are exclusively on games like Sony), that can utilize the weapons forge in FB, wouldn't that be a great integration?

If there's a certain depth in the weapon crafting, and there's a certain difficulty to obtain the weapon. Imagine the topics between the two different individuals who played two different games having the common topic to chat about.

Uh.. yeah. more of a geeky topic, but I'm a gamer. :)

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Hi Puppetier,

I've read many reasons why Developers don't or wont do it, but, none of these should hinder indie developers from challenging these obstacles to achieve innovation. I've proposed similar in discussions like this one. In fact, I'm working on a Game Engine with the intention of achieving such a feat using a Moderated Open Repository for Content Storage that can be shared between Games. My ultimate goal is to share the content and gameplay between different game (genres) clients on multiple platforms.

MOR.jpg

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Hi Techlord,

assuming the don'ts and won'ts are as per mentioned in this topic, I tried my best to google up on the jargons thrown here and there. I'm not a technical person, but my interest drives me to dwelve deeper.

How long have you been developing the game engine and what is the platform that the game engine operates on?

It's always fun to talk to another person who shares similar idea. :)

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Indie huh? I guess everything is possible in the private sector.

Then again, one of my points was, that players would be forced to play on consoles they don't own or platforms they don't like. Allow me to elaborate on this.

In your example of weapon craft, you are assuming that friends would split their tasks and, while one would play a fast paced FPS, the other would merilly craft weapons on FB. While it could be the case, I know that some people just love doing everything by themselves. That means that a single person would need to work with different enviroments to have the full experience of the game, which can be tiring, irksome or downright impossible (not having an iSomething or Console, or a FB account).

Also, there would be the same whine that always happens when games are launched on multiple platforms -- why does our game not have feature X? F*ck the fact that we have Y, we want X as well!

I understand you want to make DIFFERENT games, each suitable to the target device/platform, each with a target audience. But you are linking them to one game world, and wanting them to be specifically dependant on each other. In most games including crafting (as an example) the bane of the system is limiting the amount of profeciencies, thus having to rely on others. And internet is very unreliable, especially in the gamers sector.

I don't know if this includes the scope of your idea, but having multiple games launched on the same platform, but of different genres, is happening as we speak (development of those I mean). It seems fairly more reasonable to net a concrete type of audience (PC gamers, Sony lovers, PSP folk, FB huggers) with multiple game modes (hell, most games do that now with a variety of game-modes, or mini-games).

EDIT: Only now I saw the picture T e c h l o r d supplied and understand what he meant. And that is 100% doable in my opinion -- on the same platform at least.

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How long have you been developing the game engine and what is the platform that the game engine operates on? [/quote]I've been developing what is now Super 3D Game Platform for 2 years. Within this timeframe, I've simultaneously learned C++, Microsoft VC++ IDE, and myriad of different C++ libraries, Utility Applications, and Web-based Applications. I've learned many new C++ coding techniques and design patterns that have forced several re-writes of the engine. I'm finally at a point where I'm comfortable with my coding technique, C++ libraries, and tools to develop S3GP. I'm developing S3GP with Cross-Platform C++ Libraries on a PC, but, I'm hoping when the time comes, there are Compilers available to deploy the Engine to Consoles, Browser-based, Cellular Devices.

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Indie huh? I guess everything is possible in the private sector.

Then again, one of my points was, that players would be forced to play on consoles they don't own or platforms they don't like. Allow me to elaborate on this.

In your example of weapon craft, you are assuming that friends would split their tasks and, while one would play a fast paced FPS, the other would merilly craft weapons on FB. While it could be the case, I know that some people just love doing everything by themselves. That means that a single person would need to work with different enviroments to have the full experience of the game, which can be tiring, irksome or downright impossible (not having an iSomething or Console, or a FB account).

Also, there would be the same whine that always happens when games are launched on multiple platforms -- why does our game not have feature X? F*ck the fact that we have Y, we want X as well!

I understand you want to make DIFFERENT games, each suitable to the target device/platform, each with a target audience. But you are linking them to one game world, and wanting them to be specifically dependant on each other. In most games including crafting (as an example) the bane of the system is limiting the amount of profeciencies, thus having to rely on others. And internet is very unreliable, especially in the gamers sector.

I don't know if this includes the scope of your idea, but having multiple games launched on the same platform, but of different genres, is happening as we speak (development of those I mean). It seems fairly more reasonable to net a concrete type of audience (PC gamers, Sony lovers, PSP folk, FB huggers) with multiple game modes (hell, most games do that now with a variety of game-modes, or mini-games).

EDIT: Only now I saw the picture T e c h l o r d supplied and understand what he meant. And that is 100% doable in my opinion -- on the same platform at least.


Yes, you're right on some gamers who would do everything by themselves.

Heck, I can visualize what you're talking about because I am sort of that type of person.

I'm sure if they really dislike the platform, and despair to even touch it, they can always buy it from another player.

But again, like you said, it all boils down to the demand of the feature. While I may think that it's social integration, others might see it as just another gimmick.

If the feature is not appreciated, then it might just be another thing for them to complain about.

care to show the multiple games of different genre that you've mentioned?

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