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ayrton2388

Got my 1st interview on monday...

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So. I applied for a job in a small company, who produces iphone / android games. They asked me to come for a short interview, to talk about their games and the tools they use, and about the games i created. Well, i have an incomplete RPG game, which i will bring on monday. Thing is. Will they be interested in the source code? if so, what will they be looking for? The game still has some small glitches... oh, and they will probably think the code is messy (this game being more of a learning experience) ...

I still got like 2-3 days, so how should i prepare? what should i expect? any help would be greatly appreciated.

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* Research the games they made and what they pride themselves in -- they are bound to ask why you want to work specifically for them.
* Even if they check your game, it will be a fast skim-through, I bet they won't have the time to go into the code too much. If you have the time and feel like it, add some comments and supply some breaks to make it less messy. But I highly doubt they will want to see the source code, unless you are being recruited for something that caught their eye in your project -- in that case, make sure that the thing is exposed properly.
* Make sure you dress appropriatelly -- but I guess that isn't an issue, as most companies like that have a very casual dress code, if any.
* Learn about their tools, try them out, think how they could benefit from your experience -- if asked you could then show some knowledge and sygnalise you care about the post.
* Don't be stressed about it, or be too desparate -- both parties in an interview are on equal terms, the employer is looking for a valuable asset (employee), while the employee is looking for a worthwhile investment of his skills. While I doubt they will act all high and mighty, control your body language during the interview:
-- No crossed hands. That is a defensive position, and is subconciously read as being negative/not open. Keep your hands on your laps or anywhere else -- it may feel uncomfortable, but be sure not to cross them
-- Same goes for legs -- crossed is always insecurity.
-- While keeping eye contact is good, don't gaze into them like a voracious bird. Keep your sight in the eye-mouth region, never above, never below. Smile a lot :D
-- If you want to look serious, you may braid your fingers together -- don't use that too often if they do not.
-- When you shake hands with them, you can observe how they do it. If your hand has to go beneath theirs, it means they will try and dominate you. If theirs will be on the same level as yours (dunno how to explain this in English, hope you'll understand from the context), that is the best sign, as they will treat you like an equal. If your hand will go above theirs, they will have a submissive nature. Act accordingly and by your own nature.


If you know all this, please forgive me, but I learned that these tips are quite valuable while making a first impression on a friendly employer :wink:

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Wow, that with the hands is new to me :-) I will check that in future interviews..

What i see in my company most of the time is, that people don't get jobs because a lack of motivation and spirit. For example, my chef asked a couple of weeks ago a guy who was there for an interview if he knows Obj C etc.. The guy answered, No but i want to learn that.. .. ok good answer, .. but than my Chef said, ok.. how long would you think you need to learn it.. The guy answered.. Well, it is a C based language to probably 2 MONTHS!!

lol

We never saw him again :-)

When I had my Interview I didn't know a shit about Obj C but I was fluent in C. My chef asked me if I want to learn Obj C and how long it will take, and i answered.. give me a mac and in one week i program apps for you :0).. Well , I spend one week 16 hours a day programming Obj C and when I had my first day I got my first project to work on.

Its a lot about the spirit. If you love programming and if you love to learn new stuff etc than let them feel that. Hungry people are valuable to a company. Ok, I had to send them Source Code too. so i sent them some C++ Games i made.. but i don't think they analyzed it very deeply. Its probably more like a test that u don't talk BS :-)

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-- When you shake hands with them, you can observe how they do it. If your hand has to go beneath theirs, it means they will try and dominate you.

I only met one person in my whole life who did this. He put out his hand palm down. I tried turning his hand sideways, but he resisted. It was artist Rodney Alan Greenblat, when Activision was working on a game of his.

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* Even if they check your game, it will be a fast skim-through, I bet they won't have the time to go into the code too much. If you have the time and feel like it, add some comments and supply some breaks to make it less messy. But I highly doubt they will want to see the source code, unless you are being recruited for something that caught their eye in your project -- in that case, make sure that the thing is exposed properly.


On this, be ready to talk about the interesting parts of the game you worked on. While they may not want to pour over your source code, I find a lot of people will at least be curious about 1. how you set up your systems and 2. how excited/passionate/proud you are about the stuff you've created.

edit: Also be ready for a programming test. I've never done a second interview where I was not either asked to do a programming test beforehand or did one during the interview. You should be able to google for these. How you do on this is usually more important than other stuff for entry level, and doing well does not necessarily mean getting all the answers right.

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