Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
niklas_a

Trying to recreate old-school platformer feel

This topic is 2479 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I'm trying to recreate an old school 2D platformer with some aspects of modern physics. But somehow I can't really get the "old-skool" feel to it - I think the character animation feels wacky and moving is strange.
I'm using jBox2D for the physics if that helps anyone.

So my questions are:
1) Is it realistic to mix old-school game play with modern physics? Or should I view them as mutually exclusive goals?
2) What should I do in form of character movement to make it feel better?

[attachment=5938:pixelgame.zip]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
1) Mutually exclusive. No one plays retro games for modern physics. People play it for nostalgia. The change you should do is assure the game is working on a modern hardware and has controls that the player is used to now. Everything else should stay as in the old game (OK, maybe also gfx improvement since people tend to forget how ugly it was back then :D).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A platformer, in the traditional sense, does not typically work well with realistic physics. You can "game" the feel of movement, but you'll be sacrificing design for realism.

You're better off allowing direct control of players and then simulating elements of the levels (boxes, balls, etc.). Otherwise, you can go for an angry-birds style approach where the player is not directly controlled, but acted upon by physical forces.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
>> [color=#1C2837][size=2]2) What should I do in form of character movement to make it feel better?
[color=#1C2837][size=2]Play "Paper Mario" or yet even better, Super Mario Bros, a lot :) It has wonderful controls, especially when compared to a lot of other shitty games on the 8-bit that used stiff and clunky controls. Oh, Mario can "steer" his jump while being in air. So much for realistic physics...
[color=#1C2837][size=2]

[color=#1C2837][size=2]That doesn't mean Mario didn't follow any physical rules though. [color=#1C2837][size=2]I would make your own gravity / jump / friction and collision response mechanics, way easier to tweak. Start with making a proper collision detection system so you know wether your character is touching the floor, a ladder, ice, water, or whatsoever. Collision detection for a 2D platformer can be as easy as doing box-overlap tests. Eventually sub-divide your character in smaller boxes for a finer test. This allows to check wether your head is hitting a block, or if your shoes are really on a floor. [color=#1C2837][size=2]Then depending on the status of your character (standing, walking, in-air, in-water, climbing, ...) execute simple gravity and friction.
[color=#1C2837][size=2]

[color="#1c2837"]

[color=#1C2837][size=2]If you want modern physics on the other hand, then focus on the graphics and sound to create and old feel. It will play different though. What you could do is making your own joystick with laggy and stiff controls to compensate ;)
[color=#1C2837][size=2]

[color=#1C2837][size=2]Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't think it really matters all that much, they aren't mutually exclusive. Maybe you could have a tweaked realistic physics kinda thing? Tweak up the law until the game feels fun.

I think getting an old school feeling is more about art and sounds. Yes, the way you play matters, but not all that much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!