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tapmonkey

creating a monster stats curve

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Hello All,

my game is a dungeon crawler rpg

the game is divided up into individual levels that a party of three battles its way through. I only have a certain amount of monster sprites, so a lot of monsters get reused in different levels.

for instance i have a dragon sprite which will be used in many of the different levels but obviously have different strengths from level to level. higher level stronger monster etc.

I am trying to find a way to create a workable system for implementing and scaling the monsters. one suggestion was to outline basic stats for all the monsters and then include a multiplier in the each levels code to augment the monster to the correct strength for that level. does this seem like a good idea?

How would the original scale work. am not sure how that curve should work etc.

Any ideas on this are greatly appreciated

thanks!

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I did something similar on a project in the past, but what made it easier was a modifier in the middle denoting their "Rank". I had 4 Ranks: Minion, Lieutenant, Boss and EliteBoss (was a CoH fanatic). So I had their base stats, then ran them through the Rank modifier, then through the Level one. I was trying to recreate what you see in a lot of games, where the first time you fight something, it's pretty hard, then before you know it that same enemy is one you mow through in droves. To get this effect, you would spawn him the first time as a Level 1 Boss, then you can reuse him as say a Level 3 Minion. Don't forget, throwing a different color into your Draw routine can go a long way for variety too.

For your specific case, you could probably get more effective answers your question if you gave some idea on what kind of stats you have and how they work.

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We have four stats for players and monster alike.

atk- damage
def- defense ranking
int- accuracy modifier
hp- health

to determine accuracy there is a relation between atk and defense. the actual damage is the full numerical value of the atk

int is an accuracy modified for the output of the atk/def equation. and the level of the modifier is based on a relation between character and monster int


I did something similar on a project in the past, but what made it easier was a modifier in the middle denoting their "Rank". I had 4 Ranks: Minion, Lieutenant, Boss and EliteBoss (was a CoH fanatic). So I had their base stats, then ran them through the Rank modifier, then through the Level one. I was trying to recreate what you see in a lot of games, where the first time you fight something, it's pretty hard, then before you know it that same enemy is one you mow through in droves. To get this effect, you would spawn him the first time as a Level 1 Boss, then you can reuse him as say a Level 3 Minion. Don't forget, throwing a different color into your Draw routine can go a long way for variety too.

For your specific case, you could probably get more effective answers your question if you gave some idea on what kind of stats you have and how they work.

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Handcraft some monsters at various levels to provide an adequate challenge to the party at that level. That should give you stats at various levels. You can then figure out a formula that roughly follows fits the data points to fill the gaps.

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My usual advice is that whatever is done, make it easily modifiable (as in put the scaling code in one place, or better yet define the scaling mechanism in a non-compiled resource file). During balancing, you will want to easily tweak these (and many other) values. Stats are often the first thing we think of as defining challenge, but in a 'typical' rpg there are many other (sometimes overriding) factors. Such as:

AI - as you go deeper in levels, is monster AI going to get smarter? A group of clever level 1 munchkins working together might cause more trouble for the player than a stupid, lumbering level 5 dragon.

Tactical Factors - deeper levels may have tactical disadvantages, such as wide open spaces, ambush areas, traps, areas of limited visibility, anti-magic areas, etc.

Magic - magical spells/items usable by enemies. As a hypothetical, give the above munchkins a "wand of sleepy-time", put then in a poison trap riddled area ready to ambush the heroes, and they would hold their own on level 20 without every touching a stat.

The interplay between player's abilities and the enemies can get very complex when balancing a game. I'd say keep it simple at first - go ahead and use scale factors - but don't try to balance much until you have a pretty fleshed out game to play through.

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