Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Timous

Hi guys, just joined!

This topic is 2569 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

[color="#1C2837"]Hi, I would like [color="#1C2837"]to introduce myself as a beginner game artist (even if I am not so[color="#1C2837"] youngrolleyes.gif[color="#1C2837"]).
[color="#1C2837"]I am currently working on my first real [color="#1C2837"]game project on my spare-time, since I am also a software developer / IT trainer for HPC.


[color="#1C2837"]I would like some guidance from you guys as to which is the best way to animate low-poly models with 3DS Max, I have heard a lot about Bones and Invert Kinetics but do not know much about it, and my first tries are not a real success!
[color="#1C2837"]I am confident that joining this community is a very good thing. [color="#1C2837"]See you soon on the forum!

[color="#1c2837"]Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Hi Timous; don't worry, first tries [almost] never are. The way to go is just step by step, with progressive challenges. 

There is a very important part to have an animatable character: the rigging. Rigging usually consists of creating bone chains (or a byped object, which can be considered a ready-made, humanoid-like bone chain), assigning and weighting vertices to bones, optionally creating animation controls to make complex bone transformations easier, and testing to see if the bones and deformations are working properly.
The more time you spend making an intuitive rig, the easier it'll be to animate the character - take care, however, that the mesh will only properly deform if it's been properly modelled, with special geometry in critical parts* such as elbows and knees**, and proper use of edge loops.

I suggest you seek some video tutorials; in my opinion they're the best way to learn about this subject. Also don't forget 3DS Max's own documentation, which is very good. You can search these terms in it (preferably in the order presented): bones, skin, hi-solver, constraints, byped, physique.

* Image taken from poopinmymouth.com
** Image taken from X-Cloud's free Swordmaster tutorial.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Kryzon, thank you very much for your nice message :)

There is a very important part to have an animatable character: the rigging. Rigging usually consists of creating bone chains (or a byped object, which can be considered a ready-made, humanoid-like bone chain), assigning and weighting vertices to bones, optionally creating animation controls to make complex bone transformations easier, and testing to see if the bones and deformations are working properly.
The more time you spend making an intuitive rig, the easier it'll be to animate the character

Thank you for your advice. As a long-term 3D hobbyist, I know all this theory, but never put it in practice... and it scares me!


- take care, however, that the mesh will only properly deform if it's been properly modelled, with special geometry in critical parts* such as elbows and knees**, and proper use of edge loops.

Excellent links: I now understand that I need to patch my model (especially for knees and other junctions) by simplifying the mesh rather than make it more complex.


I suggest you seek some video tutorials; in my opinion they're the best way to learn about this subject. Also don't forget 3DS Max's own documentation, which is very good. You can search these terms in it (preferably in the order presented): bones, skin, hi-solver, constraints, byped, physique.

* Image taken from poopinmymouth.com
** Image taken from X-Cloud's free Swordmaster tutorial.

Thank you for the tips. PoopInMouth (laugh.gif) models are wonderful! As you said, "[color="#1C2837"]The way to go is just step by step, with progressive challenges". Mine starts by rigging a simple worm / snake.
I let you know about my progress. Are you a skilled 3DS Max user?

Tim

[size="1"]And please forgive my English, I am not a native speaker...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't worry, I understood you perfectly. I'm not a native speaker either. :)
I may be skilled with the software itself, but my modelling isn't as good as that of dedicated artists - that is, I don't invest all my time in it.
A few icons I made for a personal project.


Mine starts by rigging a simple worm / snake.

Great; in that case, make sure to study the Spline IK solver, as that's perfect to animate elongated objects through paths.

PS: I mentioned that XCloud Swordmaster tutorial. I don't think there's any problem sharing it, since it was available for free in his website back in the day when it was online, so here you go:
http://www.mediafire...y9iifcocynzp73f - It's all in korean, but the pictures are totally worth it.
Not to be confused with 3DTotal's commercial and of inferior quality remake of this tutorial in english, with the re-modelling and re-texturing of the character.

Bye.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!